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  • Twitter co-founder: Compound impact in altruism     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:34 PM ET

    The "Power Lunch" team asks Twitter co-founder Biz Stone about his impression of the government shutdown, and whether technology can save the country. "The younger generation is becoming more aware of the meaningfulness of things," he explains.

  • Inside a $54 million Malibu mansion     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:44 PM ET

    CNBC's Robert Frank shares a peak at Wednesday's season finale of "Secret Lives of the Super Rich."

  • How the Spanx founder failed her way to billions     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:41 PM ET

    Sara Blakely, founder and inventor of Spanx shares her father's parenting strategy of encouraging failure. CNBC's Robert Frank reports.

  • Twitter co-founder Biz Stone says his hope for Twitter is that the technology "fades away," and that the company becomes a "triumph of humanity." He also discusses a net loss of $60 million last quarter.

  • Businesses disappointed by shutdown     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:24 PM ET

    CNBC's Mary Thompson reports on the broader impact of the government shutdown. FedEx CEO Fred Smith told CNBC his business has tens of thousands of shipments that cannot be delivered to the U.S. government.

  • Need a long-term plan in US: Laser Plus CEO     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:18 PM ET

    John Tucker, founder and CEO of Laser Plus Imaging addresses the uncertainty his business has faced during the government shutdown. Rep. James Lankford (R-OK), says the government could be back open by Thursday.

  • John Tucker, founder and CEO of Laser Plus Imaging asks Rep. James Lankford (R-OK) what lawmakers have done to instill confidence in Congress.

  • House meeting at 3PM over Senate deal     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:48 PM ET

    The Senate has reached a bipartisan deal to extend government funding through January 15th, reports CNBC's John Harwood. It appears the U.S. has averted a potential debt default, he says.

  • Waste Management CEO David Steiner urges Washington to find a better way to solve the country's debt issues. "We need to do a better job in the U.S. government of running the political process through compromise," he says.

  • Rep. James Lankford (R-OK) says there is a little bit of buzz happening in the House as some have heard preliminary details of the Senate deal. "We are nibbling around the edges," he says as debt continues to climb.

  • Nasdaq 100 hits 13-year highs     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 1:10 PM ET

    CNBC's Seema Mody reports shares of both Intel and Yahoo are higher after reporting earnings Tuesday night.

  • Carney: President Obama applauds Senate     Wednesday, 16 Oct 2013 | 12:59 PM ET

    White House Press Secretary Jay Carney addresses the harm a default would have on the economy. He says President Obama applauds the leaders of the Senate to come together and work out a bipartisan solution.

  • Glitches in new college common application     Tuesday, 15 Oct 2013 | 1:53 PM ET

    NYU Stern School of Business dean Peter Henry says NYU is not seeing an issue with its common application, despite reported glitches. Also, are we seeing the end of the landline?

  • Washington impact on mutual funds     Tuesday, 15 Oct 2013 | 1:46 PM ET

    Mutual funds on average have been beating the S&P 500 this year. CNBC's Seema Mody reports the trend has reversed.

  • Jay Sidhu, CEO of Customers Bancorp, shares two examples in which the shutdown figured in client decisions.

  • Noted hedge fund manager David Tepper says he understands why the Fed didn't taper. Michael Wilson of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, says his firm sees the global economy "healing.

  • Steve Liesman puts himself in Lew's shoes     Tuesday, 15 Oct 2013 | 1:28 PM ET

    If the U.S. breaches the debt ceiling, the Treasury will have to get creative in deciding what gets paid. CNBC's Steve Liesman acts like Treasury Secretary Jack Lew.

  • 'Ivy leaguers' still the most desired?     Tuesday, 15 Oct 2013 | 1:21 PM ET

    The CEO of Burberry Angela Ahrendts is leaving the company to head Apple's retail division. Peter Blair, dean of NYU Stern School of Business; and CNBC's Jon Fortt and Robert Frank, discuss whether "ivy leaguers" are still at the top of businesses.

  • Burberry CEO to head Apple's retail division     Tuesday, 15 Oct 2013 | 1:18 PM ET

    The CEO of Burberry Angela Ahrendts is leaving the company to head Apple's retail division, reports CNBC's Robert Frank.

  • Economist Robert Shiller is saying home prices look reasonable. CNBC's Diana Olick, and Shari Olefson, CEO of The Carnegie Group. "There is an argument to be made for bubble 2.0," explains Olick.

About Power Lunch

  • CNBC's Sue Herera and Tyler Mathisen take you through the heart of the business day with intelligent and lively debate on the day’s biggest stories, whether they originate on Wall Street or in Washington. "Power Lunch" delves into the economy, the markets, real estate, media and technology –- anywhere there’s money to be made. "Power Lunch" also takes you outside the studio and into some of the hottest spots where news is being made, broadcasting live from conferences, trade shows and even restaurants where the real power lunches are taking place.

Contact Power Lunch

 

  • Tyler Mathisen co-anchors CNBC's "Power Lunch." Mathisen also co-anchors "Nightly Business Report produced by CNBC."

  • Sue Herera is a founding member of CNBC, helping to launch the network in 1989. She is co-anchor of "Power Lunch."

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