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Outsourcing Investments: Traders Look Overseas

Wednesday, 13 Dec 2006 | 5:09 PM ET

With the dollar dropping against the pound, euro and, until recently, the yen, it’s no secret investors are looking overseas. Foreign markets are showing bigger discounts and more upside. David Winters of Wintergreen Advisors is one such investor, and he says the majority of his assets are outside the U.S. these days. “It’s harder to find really good deals here,” he says.

Appearing on “Closing Bell” with Maria Bartiromo, Winters says he’s “very enthusiastic” about the opportunities in Asia, calling the wealth creation there “mind-boggling.” Companies like Swire Pacific are undervalued and well run, he says.

Dollar Doldrums
The decline in the dollar could hurt foreign investments in the U.S. for a long time, according to David Winters, Wintergreen Advisers CEO. He shares his view with CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

As a way to counterbalance possible growth slowdowns in China, Winters has ownership in three European companies – Imperial Tobacco and Anglo American of the U.K. and soap-detergent maker Henkel in Germany. He thinks these stocks will persevere through strong and weak cycles.

Wintergreen Advisors is focused on direct investments in these markets, but buying into funds with holdings overseas might be a good strategy for investors to get a piece of the action.

Analyst disclosure: David Winters either owns directly or through mutual funds the following stocks: AAUK, WY, KOF, HEN and SWRAY.

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  • With almost 30 years experience in business television, Bill Griffeth is co-anchor of the 3 p.m. ET hour of CNBC's "Closing Bell."

  • Kelly Evans

    Kelly Evans is an on-air correspondent, reporting across CNBC's business day programming. She is co-anchor of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street."