GO
Loading...

Intel to Submit Evidence in AMD Suit

Chip-maker Intel said it would not object to a court order to produce documents related to its international business practices, as part of an antitrust case filed by rival Advanced Micro Devices.

Advanced Micro Devices said the court order was a "significant legal victory."

In a letter to Judge Joseph Farnan in the U.S. Federal District Court in Delaware, Intel said it plans to cooperate with the court order and that it does not plan to file an objection.

Intel also noted that the Special Master explicitly said it was not making decisions about whether the evidence would be admissible in court.

In September, a federal judge ruled that if AMD wins the antitrust case filed in the U.S., it cannot receive damages for Intel's alleged monopolistic practices overseas.

Symbol
Price
 
Change
%Change
SUPREMETEX
---
INTC
---

The lawsuit dates to June 2005, when AMD initiated an antitrust case against Intel, alleging that its business was harmed by Intel's practice of offering rebates, discounts and other incentives to persuade PC makers to use Intel chips instead of AMD chips. AMD argued that Intel sustains a monopoly which allows it to charge higher prices.

Intel responded that AMD's problems were rooted in its reputation for being an unreliable supplier and that it failed to adequately invest in its business.

Contact U.S. News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.

Don't Miss

  • The Glass Ceiling

    Full-time working women still only earn about 77% of what men do in the same fields. A lawsuit in Silicon Valley is bringing renewed focus to that statistic. Vanity Fair Contributing Editor Bethany McLean on the equality fight for women's pay and promotion.

  • Man takes off work clothes on beach

    With Ruth Porat leaving Wall Street for Silicon Valley, Turney Duff takes a look at other ex-Wall Street friends and where they are now.

  • A group of scientists believe they've cracked the reason behind a big mystery: Why are beards so popular?

U.S. Video