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Corporate America: "Warming Up" To Climate Change?

We've mentioned today's report on global warming inan earlier post--so let's get right to one of the major questions: is corporate America taking global warming as a serious issue or not? Some are it seems as reported earlier this monthwhen10 companies and their CEOs joined activist groups in calling for caps on carbon emissions. (GE--the parent company of CNBC is one of those companies). And as for others? They may be getting there.

Zoe Riddell is from the Carbon Disclosure Project. The CDP provides a secretariat--or forum for the world's largest institutional investor collaboration on the business implications of climate change. Mindy Lubber is president of Ceres--an environmental group. Both were on "Power Lunch."

Riddell believes that at the least--American investors are becoming more "concerned" when it comes to global warming. She pointed to a recent letter that was sent out from her group on global warming to some of the world's largest companies--and that the majority of signees on the letter were from big U.S. institutional investors.

Lubber says it's certainly time to start an emissions cap and that when she was in Davos for the World Economic Forum last week--global warming was one of the major issues for CEOs. Riddell agreed that the time to start working on an emissions cap is now --as costs on the world's GDP (gross domestic product) to control global warming will be cheaper now than in the future (she says the CDP does not take a political position on global warming).

FYI-a recent poll taken of CEOs and global warming (see related link) showed that 70% of CEOs in Japan thought global warming was a major conern--while only 18% of American CEOs said it was.

Today's report says that scientists from 113 countries have little doubt that recent global warming has been caused by man, and predicting that hotter temperatures and rises in sea level will “continue for centuries” no matter how much humans control their carbon emissions. But a report in the British paper The Guardian--said that scientists were offered money to dispute the issue of climate change from a lobby group.

And for it's part--The White House says it takes the issue of global warming very seriously. However--Congress is investigating whether the Bush administration forced government scientists to "play down" the issue of global warming.

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