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JetBlue Weathers The Storm

Tuesday, 20 Feb 2007 | 4:53 PM ET
JetBlue Airways passengers wait for flights, John F. Kennedy Airport, New York, photo
AP
JetBlue Airways passengers wait for flights, John F. Kennedy Airport, New York, photo

The airline famous for loving customers may be wondering where's the love in the aftermath of a Valentine's Day ice storm that slammed the Northeast and crippled service. Not ony were some passengers trapped on planes for 11 hours as planes were idled by unusable runways, but JetBlue struggled to resume normal service for days after that. Even come Monday, the carrier cancelled 23% of its flights.

Chairman and CEO David Neeleman has repeatedly faced the music (the media, that is), confronting the issues and circumstances that caused his seven-year-old airline to cancel 1100 flights in six days.

What he describes as a mortifying and humiliating experience, Neeleman is trying to make good, in part by offering troubled customers vouchers for their woes. There's also a new customer "Bill of Rights" drafted to ensure JetBlue loyalists some peace of mind.

JetBlue says the debacle -- from passenger compensation to plans to hire additional staff -- could cost as much as $30 million. First-quarter earnings will take a hit. And its stock is certainly feeling the pain Tuesday.

Here's a look at CNBC video coverage of this event as it unfolded this past week.

  Price   Change %Change
JBLU
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JetBlue Comeback
Analyzing JetBlue's efforts to win back customers, with CNBC's Rebecca Jarvis; Chris Denove, J.D. Power and Associates voice of the customer practice VP; Agnes Huff, PhD & aviation crisis management expert and CNBC's Melissa Francis

JetBlue Comeback
Analyzing JetBlue's efforts to win back customers, with CNBC's Rebecca Jarvis; Chris Denove, J.D. Power and Associates voice of the customer practice VP; Agnes Huff, PhD & aviation crisis management expert and CNBC's Melissa Francis.
Tues. Feb. 20 2007 | 2:03:00 PM [07:48]

Passenger Bill of Rights
One plane spends nine hours on the runway and the airline introduces a Passenger Bill of Rights, with David Neeleman, JetBlue Airways CEO and CNBC's Mark Haines & Melissa Lee

Passenger Bill of Rights
One plane spends nine hours on the runway and the airline introduces a Passenger Bill of Rights, with David Neeleman, JetBlue Airways CEO and CNBC's Mark Haines & Melissa Lee.
Tues. Feb. 20 2007 | 9:18:00 AM [05:52]

Jet Blues
JetBlue tries to recover from its latest customer service snafu, with Michael Boyd, The Boyd Group president & aviation analyst; Rebecca Jarvis, CNBC Business News and CNBC's Carl Quintanilla

Jet Blues
Michael Boyd, president of The Boyd Group an aviation consulting and forecasting group, speaks with Carl Quintanilla. Rebecca Jarvis reports from JFK airport in New York City.
Tues. Feb. 20 2007 | 8:10:00 AM [06:04]

Flight Rights
A plan to protect passengers, with Kate Hanni, Coalition for an Airline Passengers Bill of Rights spokesperson and CNBC's Maria Bartiromo

Flight Rights
Kate Hanni, spokesperson for the Coalition for an Airline Passengers Bill of Rights speaks to Maria Bartiromo about the proposal.
Thurs. Feb. 15 2007 | 4:20:00 PM [03:43]

JetBlue's Damage Control
A closer look at what went wrong when storms grounded JetBlue passengers for more than 8 hours, with David Neeleman, JetBlue Airways CEO and CNBC's Maria Bartiromo

JetBlue's Damage Control
CEO David Neeleman talks to Maria Bartiromo about what went wrong the day of the storm when passengers were trapped in grounded planes.
Thurs. Feb. 15 2007 | 4:15:00 PM [06:30]

The Jet Blues
A look at JetBlue's weather-related mishap with CNBC's Rebecca Jarvis

The Jet Blues
CNBC's Rebecca Jarvis reports on the weather-related mishap from New York's JFK airport.
Thurs. Feb. 15 2007 | 10:10:00 AM [02:53]

  Price   Change %Change
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