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Cramer’s Call: Nastech Pharmaceutical CEO Dr. Stephen Quay

Thursday, 19 Apr 2007 | 6:55 PM ET

There are few stocks that could run up 20 points in a hurry that Cramer wouldn’t recommend getting out of. Nastech Pharmaceutical is one. There are a bunch of ways to win with this biotech, Cramer says, from obesity, to osteoporosis to autism - “there are so many things to go right here.”

Nastech CEO
Discussing pharmaceuticals with Nastech's chairman, president and CEO, Dr. Steven Quay



Nastech’s CEO Dr. Stephen Quay says he's excited about a myriad of projects at his company, especially a hormone drug for osteoporisis that is in development, an insulin nasal spray for diabetes and an obesity treatment.

Quay says Nastech has six mid-stage or later clinical programs with significant commercial value that are at the “inflection point” – between phase one and phase two testing. Three of the programs are in diabetes and obesity, two are in osteoporosis and one is in autism, he says.

Nastech has five valuable partnerships worth over $650 million or $25 per share in milestone payments over the next few years, Quay says. In addition, he says his company is one of the leaders in RNA interface therapeutics, which is an area that is very highly valued in the marketplace, according to Cramer.

When it comes to biotech, Cramer has generally stuck with three names: Celgene , Genzyme and Gilead . But he thinks Nastech has more ways to win than any of the others, and he likes it here along with the others.



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