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Breaking Up, Dog Eat Dog World & Another Survey

Breaking Up Not So Hard To Do

A company called YouMail lets you create specific voicemail messages for specific incoming callers, like a professional message when your boss calls, or a warm and fuzzy voicemail message when mom calls. Now it’s put a wicked twist on the idea, called Ditchmail. Originally intended to block telemarketers, Gen X,Y,Z-ers (is there a Z yet?) are using the service to dump bad dates.

Apparently breaking up via text message is “so yesterday.” Voicemail is so much more…personal. With Ditchmail, when a potential dumpee calls in, your voicemail might say, “this number is no longer in service.” Ditchmail’s Ken Brickley tells Wireless Flash News, "It's for when you wake up Saturday morning, look at your phone and say, ‘Who’s Bob?’ Then when Bob keeps calling, we come in to help you.”

The service is free at www.YouMail.com. The site is supported by advertising. Ditchmail suggests you go easy on one-night stands you never wish to see again, with a voicemail that says something like, “I don’t think last night was a good idea.” Nice…

It’s a Dog Eat Dog World, and It Pays by the Hour

Half of all hourly workers surveyed say they support a raise in the minimum wage even if it means a co-worker loses a job. HALF! I guess as long as it’s not your job on the line! I suppose I should look at the glass as half full and say, hey, the other 50% say they’d prefer to keep making what they’re making as long as everyone keeps working. The results are from Dominion Enterprises’ Employment Guide on hourly workers. Other nuggets:

Two in three hourly workers support a higher minimum wage even if it means higher consumer prices.

Eighty-four percent of hourly workers are satisfied with their current jobs, and the vast majority prefers being paid by the hour rather than getting a salary.

Another Survey

Quaker Rice Snacks says 23% of Americans have eaten a snack off the floor. So much for all that hard-to-open packaging to keep rice cakes sanitary.

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  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

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