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Branson to Buy Back 49% Virgin Stake from Singapore Airline: Report

Richard Branson is willing to buy back Singapore Airlines' 49 percent stake in his airline, Virgin Atlantic, London's Times newspaper reported.

Singapore Airlines is reported to be planning to sell the Virgin stake, bought for 600 million pounds ($1.2 billion) in 1999. It is believed to be considering four options, including a resale to Branson.

"We are happy to have a look at it. It is a possibility that we could buy back Singapore Airlines' stake should it be up for sale," Branson was quoted by the article as saying.

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