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Dow Losses of 400 Points or More

We have had only one other drop of the Dow of 400 or more points this year. That occurred on February 27, 2007, when the Dow fell 416.02 points, or -3.3%.

Before then, we have not seen a 400 point drop since Sept. 17, 2001, when the Dow lost 685 points, or 7.13%

In the past 20 years, there has only been one year with more than one 400 point drop. The Dow dropped 436 points on March 12, 2001, and another 685 points on Sept 17, 2001.

The number of 400 point or more drops since 1987:

  • In 2001, the Dow fell more than 400 points twice.
  • In 2007, excluding today, the Dow fell more than 400 points once.
  • In 2000, the Dow fell more than 400 points once.
  • In 1998, the Dow fell more than 400 points once.
  • In 1997, the Dow fell more than 400 points once.
  • In 1987, the Dow fell more than 400 points once.

After a 400 point drop in the Dow (7 Occurrences, not including today)...

  • 1 Day later the Dow is up 86% of the time an average of 3.06%
  • 1 Day later the S&P 500 is up 86% of the time an average of 3.25%
  • 1 Day later the NASDAQ is up 71% of the time an average of 4.23%
  • 1 Week later the Dow is up 57% of the time an average of 4.23%
  • 1 Week later the S&P 500 is up 57% of the time an average of 3.91%
  • 1 Week later the NASDAQ is up 57% of the time an average of 5.46%
  • 1 Month later the Dow is up 86% of the time an average of 4.97%
  • 1 Month later the S&P 500 is up 100% of the time an average of 4.60%
  • 1 Month later the NASDAQ is up 86% of the time an average of 5.09%

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