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Mattel Names Chinese Plant in Toy Recall: WSJ

Mattel has named the Chinese factory involved in the company's recall of 1.5 million toys that contained lead paint, The Wall Street Journal reported on its Web site Tuesday evening.

The plant is Lee Der Industrial in China's Guangdong province, the Journal reported Mattel as saying.

The identification comes after some critics complained about Mattel's unwillingness to name the plant, the Journal reported. Mattel is no longer receiving shipments from the factory, the paper said.

Under U.S. law, companies bargaining with the government before agreeing to a voluntary recall, do not have to name the manufacturers involved, the Journal said.

Mattel had said it did not want to name the plant until it completed an investigation, the paper also said.

A Mattel spokeswoman was not immediately available for comment.

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