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What YOU Want from Chrysler

Friday, 17 Aug 2007 | 11:21 AM ET
AP

A few days ago I blogged about the state of Chrysler and posed a simple question: What do you want to see from Chrysler for you to consider buying a car or truck from the American automaker?








The number of answers e-mailed to Behind the Wheel surprised me. Here's a sampling of what you wrote:

Robert from Maryland, in the market for a new car, wrote:
"...unfortunately for chrysler, my perception of their vehicles is shaky quality in both the engines & transmissions (the most expensive components). until that situation changes, it would take a large discount/incentive to get me..."

Tom had a similar thought on Chrysler's quality writing:
"What Chrysler has to prove is that it can perform on par with the Japanese. My past experience indicates that it hasn't done so in the past, and it would have to convince me before I tried another of its products."

Mark thinks Chryslers designer can recapture out interest. He said:
"...the Charger shows that Chrysler can still design and build inspiring vehicles. Last year, I had a Charger R/T Hemi as a rental and drove it from Vegas to Lake Tahoe and back. I liked it so much I just about went out and bought one".

But Brian wants more. He wrote:
"...to sum it up: Dodge and Chrysler both need a new design language if they want lifelong buyers like me. They are at least 5 years behind where GM in today."

Finally, Scott in New York simply wants fresh looks and ideas from Chrysler. He e-mailed:
"These companies need to be innovators and should not be playing catch up to the foreign auto makers. It's sad, but everyone else is just doing what they do, better."

Bottom line: Chrysler has its work cut out winning buyers. There's a fair amount of skepticism from the people who e-mailed me.

Thanks for you e-mails. There will ne another next week on a different topic

Questions? Comments? BehindTheWheel@cnbc.com

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  • Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based in the Chicago bureau and editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

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