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Reporter's Notebook: New Orleans After Katrina

By CNBC.com
Friday, 24 Aug 2007 | 7:17 PM ET

Two years ago on August 29, Hurricane Katrina hit the city of New Orleans as well as other parts of Louisiana and the state of Mississippi.

The massive storm, which caused more than $125 billion in economic damage in the region, is the greatest natural disaster in the history of the U.S.

The storm was one thing, but extensive flooding actually caused more damage. About 80% of the city was under water at one point. Tens of thousands of houses were left uninhabitable.

About four weeks later, Hurricane Rita hit and dumped even more water on a city that had been turned into a lake of misery and despair.

Reporter's Notebook: Katrina
In a personal reflection on covering Hurricane Katrina then and now, CNBC's Scott Cohn discusses his experience with CNBC's Brian Shactman

In the past two years, New Orleans has battled back. Those who visit its downtown and tourist area might conclude that all is back to normal. Outside the central city, however, a mighty struggle goes on.

CNBC's Scott Cohn was in New Orleans two years ago for the disaster and has been covering the story ever since, including his major contribution to the CNBC documentary "Against The Tide: The Battle For New Orleans."

Cohn sat down with Brian Shactman to share his experiences and insights in an exclusive CNBC.com "Reporter's Notebook" video.

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