GO
Loading...

Enter multiple symbols separated by commas

Myanmar Crackdown Draws Outrage, Protests

Top U.S. phone company AT&T is eyeing a wireless acquisition in India, a market it is focusing on as a key growth opportunity, the Wall Street Journal reported in its online edition.

The report, citing people familiar with the situation, said AT&T was also looking to significantly expand its Internet and phone services to businesses in India.

AT&T Chief Executive Randall Stephenson was quoted as saying he saw the country as a "multibillion-dollar revenue opportunity."

Stephenson, who took over from Ed Whitacre in June, also said in the Journal report that he is seeking partnerships in Dubai and plans to bid on wireless spectrum in an upcoming auction in Qatar.

Stephenson said in an interview with Reuters earlier in the year that the company was open to buying overseas assets.

AT&T launched a commercial business in India earlier this year. Last year it became the first foreign carrier to secure a license for long-distance and international services in India under a revised policy that allows foreigners to own up to 74% of their Indian units.

Contact Asia News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.

Asia Video

  • European sharing economy can grow rapidly: ING

    Ian Bright, senior economist at ING, discusses the findings of ING's latest survey which revealed that the sharing economy is poised for rapid growth in Europe.

  • What a 'Yes' vote means for Greece

    Richard Champion, deputy CIO at Canaccord Genuity Wealth Management, says Greece will see further instability in the short to medium term if the "Yes" camp wins Sunday's referendum.

  • A 'No' vote doesn't mean a 'Grexit': StanChart

    Manpreet Gill, senior investment strategist at Standard Chartered, says a "No" vote in Sunday's referendum will give Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras more bargaining power, but it doesn't necessarily means a "Grexit."