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Hollywood's Newest Hit: The Color Green

Lime Green Prius

In the entertainment industry, the idea of being green is very, very cool. You can't go two feet without seeing a Prius--they're even becoming the limo-of-choice for the Oscars. I myself bought a Prius in May and I love it. Not only is it eco-friendly, but it's also incredibly convenient. Not having to fill up that often saves a ton of money, and all that time wasted at the gas station. Tons of time.

It's amazing how spread out Hollywood is--there are studios in the valley, Paramount is in Hollywood proper, and then Sony is all the way over in Culver City. To get between these studios takes lots of time and gas. And for those looking for something on the higher end, the Lexus hybrid seems to be quite popular, though not as efficient as my little Prius.

In covering this beat, I've found Hollywood's love affair with green goes beyond the cars. I'm not talking about Al Gore and his leveraging Hollywood attention to spread a message about global warming. I'm talking about nuts and bolts. More and more office buildings are going up. And at the Emmy's this past year I reported on a new green building being built by New Pacific Realty in Beverly Hills. It'll be state of the art, fancy shmancy designed by Richard Meier--and totally green.

The studios are even making their productions green--Universal Pictures' "Evan Almighty" was the first carbon-neutral film: which meant that the studio bought carbon credits to account for the cost of the movie on the environment.

Just this weekend I was talking with some "industry" folks about how hard it is to be green, but how everyone is trying. One new trend-- buy carbon emissions credits to make yourself, or an event (like a big Emmy party or a wedding) totally carbon neutral. It used to be only companies could make themselves carbon neutral, but now anyone can help minimize their negative impact on the environment.

Questions? Comments? MediaMoney@cnbc.com

  • Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.