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Death "Takes" A Holiday But Still Manages To Go Green!

Neptune Society
CNBC.com
Neptune Society

Ah, the holidays! What better time to think about...death? The Neptune Society must have hired a new PR person because I'm getting press releases:

"Rise in Cremations a Sign of Changing Times!
Cremations now account for over 30% of all funeral services in the U.S. according to the Cremation Association of North America. Some states like Nevada, Arizona, California, and Florida are up to over 50 per cent; Hawaii leads the U.S. in cremations at 66%. The national average is projected to reach close to 45% by 2025."

Wow, the Cremation Association of North America (who's in that?) is telling us cremations are up! I'm seeking a response from the National Brotherhood of Embalmers (made that up).

Now, the Neptune Society is promoting an earth-friendly way to leave earth. It's building The Neptune Memorial Reef off the coast of Miami, which will re-create the Lost City of Atlantis and "will be the largest and most enchanting man-made reef of its type in the world." The reef will cover more than 16 acres and have room for more than 125,000 remains, but will also be a "living city" where marine life can thrive and be an "engineering wonder" that will attract divers...and the dead. They're even pitching it north of the border as a great final resting place for Canadian snowbirds.

Why build a reef? The CEO says "We're trying to make the Neptune Society a green company." YES, DEATH GOES GREEN.

The Neptune Society leads in the inexpensive cremation biz--they know more about ashes-to-ashes than anyone--owned by BG Capital Corp., a private company headed by Canadian entrepreneur Bobby Genovese. I went to the web site to check it out, www.neptunesociety.com, and they have made it a little...livelier. Though on the Investor Relations page, they're still talking about wanting "to expand to Internet based transactions in 2005..." Maybe the web master passed away.

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  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

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