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RIM Goes Windows! Eh, Not Really (You'll See Why)

CNBC.com

The news, such that it was, seemed intriguing: a blog reported that Research in Motion announced plans this morning at the big CTIA Wireless show in Vegas, that it was going to unveil a Windows Mobile compatible BlackBerry.

That would be big news for both RIM and Microsoft and make for a wireless marriage that would have been unheard of just a few short, well, hours before.

I read the news and thought, hmmmmm, could it be? And then I checked the calendar, and contacted Microsoft for comment, and confirmed the obvious: April Fools!

But that didn't stop Briefing.comfrom picking up the story, which lead analyst firm McAdams Wright Regan to release a note to clients about all this as "good news for Microsoft," reiterating its "buy" on the company and its $40 target on its shares.

I mean , it seemed real enough, complete with quote from RIM's co-CEO Mike Lazardis: "We expect this device to ship in RIM's portfolio of award-winning products by mid-summer enalbing thousands of organizations around the world and include the BlackBerry with Windows Mobile wireless platform to their employees."

Trouble is, Microsoft knows nothing about this. Because it ain't true.

Other good ones: Microsoft abandons Windows Mobile for the Apple iPhone operating system; Apple announces a Windows compatible iPhone; Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will host Saturday Night Live; and Google and Richard Branson will sponsor a manned mission to Mars (see Jane Wells post).

Trouble is, the RIM/Microsoft hoax was potentially market-moving. And that means today is kind of like a financial minefield out there for investors. Happy April Fools! And let's be careful out there!

Update:McAdams Wright Regan just released the following statement:
"We saw the story below on Briefing.com this morning. My analyst, Sid Parakh, cannot verify any of the facts in the article, and Sid believes it is an April Fools joke. Here is the source Briefing.com used. It does look a bit suspicious! I have not seen Briefing.com withdraw the story yet. Sorry if we added to the confusion."

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