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  • Why Europe's Banks Are on a Borrowing Binge Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 3:24 PM ET
    Euro bills

    Traders point to the fact that there is no sign that Europe’s credit markets are beginning to seize up as they did last spring, with banks worrying about each other’s counter-party risk. That’s evident from the fact that there is no spike in LIBOR, the interest rate at which banks borrow unsecured cash from each other on London's wholesale market.

  • What's Up With Eurodollar Futures? Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 1:40 PM ET

    CNBC's Rick Santelli just reported that 100,000 Eurodollar front March futures contracts were sold this morning. That is the largest trade that he can remember in his 31 years in the pits.

  • Can the Rally Continue?     Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 11:00 AM ET

    As Bernanke faces heat over his policies, which some believe is causing inflation around the world, investors wonder whether the rally will continue, with David Katz, Matrix Asset Advisors; Barry Knapp, Barclays. and CNBC's Guy Johnson.

  • A mystery is brewing at the European Central Bank, and China is getting some indirect heat. Here's your FXFix for Friday.

  • Inflation Is the Taboo Subject at the G20 Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 9:50 AM ET

    In the five-star Westin Hotel in Paris Friday, the world's top central bankers met to discuss the risks facing the global economy in 2011.

  • Egyptians Say Military Discourages an Open Economy Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:48 AM ET
    Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Some Spanish Savings Banks Want More Time to Recover Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:08 AM ET
    Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • For Germany’s Banks, a Grim Future Thursday, 17 Feb 2011 | 4:49 AM ET
    Global Credit Crisis

    The woes of WestLB, which has received $11 billion in taxpayer support since 2009, are symptomatic of a larger problem in the German economy. Many of its biggest banks are still on government life support after making bad lending bets during the bubble years. The New York Times reports.

  • A trader at the New York Stock Exchange.

    Investors looking for a pull back are wondering if Tuesday's stock market weakness is the start of a quick sell off, but it may not be.

  • The British pound had a rough day today, trading down against the dollar and the euro, and these analysts aren't expecting a big upturn any time soon.

  • Nice Day For The Dollar, A Little Less So For Europe Wednesday, 16 Feb 2011 | 10:43 AM ET

    The dollar delivers, and the pound takes a pounding. Here's your daily wrap of news getting attention in currency circles.

  • Liquidity-Induced Bubble Could Burst: Fund Manager Wednesday, 16 Feb 2011 | 2:45 AM ET

    "While valuations are not yet stratospheric we question where the support may come from for continued earnings growth in 2012 and 2013," Pedro de Noronha, managing partner at Noster Capital in London, said.

  • Europe Stocks Set To Open Higher on Earnings Hope Wednesday, 16 Feb 2011 | 2:10 AM ET
    A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares were set to edge up Wednesday on optimism for European companies' health as the latest raft of results is released.

  • Prices are rising in China and Britain, eurozone leaders are talking (and talking), and traders would like Americans to go shopping, already.

  • Europe Shares to Open Higher, Eyes on UK Inflation Tuesday, 15 Feb 2011 | 2:15 AM ET
    Traders sit in front of their screens at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares are expected to open higher on Tuesday, extending the previous session's 29-month closing high.

  • The Euro And The Yuan Could Use Some Good Lovin' Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 12:25 PM ET

    Europe gets messier, and the Chinese are (finally) buying someone else's stuff—Here's your FX Fix.

  • The Worst Hyperinflation Situations of All Time Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 9:28 AM ET
    Imagine that during the time it took to drink a cup of coffee, the price of that cup of coffee doubled. Although extreme, this becomes the reality of hyperinflation, where prices change so rapidly that everyday items rise exponentially and money becomes worthless, virtually overnight or even in the course of a working day. Today, inflation has become a major topic of debate in the United States, and although many are concerned about the effects of a devalued dollar on the economy, history shows

    What were some of the worst inflation situations in history and how did they come to be? Click to find out!

  • Weber Says Hawkish Views Led to ECB Race Exit Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 5:29 AM ET

    Bundesbank president Axel Weber said a lack of political acceptance in the eurozone for his hawkish monetary views had driven his abrupt decision not to run. The FT reports.

  • Hey Europe Have You Heard, There's A Party Going On Friday, 11 Feb 2011 | 2:16 PM ET
    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak

    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's stepping down has kicked off a massive celebration in Egypt, but the unrest there sure isn't helping the euro.

  • Unrest in Egypt, Safety in Dollars Friday, 11 Feb 2011 | 10:31 AM ET

    ...China takes baby steps and Vietnam dings its dong—again. Here's your FX Fix.