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Chinese Yuan

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  • China Is Poised to Raise Rates Again, Bankers Say Wednesday, 2 Feb 2011 | 10:19 AM ET
    Chinese Yuan

    China’s government, increasingly worried about soaring inflation, plans to continue tightening its money supply and will probably raise interest rates again within the month, reports the New York Times.

  • Inflation Slowing China's Export Engine Monday, 31 Jan 2011 | 7:28 PM ET
    Chinese shipping containers

    Inflation is starting to slow China’s mighty export machine, as buyers from Western multinational companies balk at higher prices and have cut back their planned spring shipments across the Pacific. The NYT reports.

  • Send the Ultimate Message to China Friday, 21 Jan 2011 | 4:21 PM ET
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    A number of people, myself included, have looked to Ronald Reagan’s Cold War triumph over the Soviet Union as a possible solution to Red China’s rising arrogance. Times are different today. But Reagan argued forcefully that domestic economic growth is the best weapon against foreign threats.

  • Farr: Hu’s On First! Thursday, 20 Jan 2011 | 3:42 PM ET
    Beijing, China

    Chinese President Hu Jintao is in Washington this week meeting with President Obama and members of Congress. While the meetings are reportedly cordial, there isn’t much agreement economically. No surprise.

  • US Companies Winning Big From Better China Relations Thursday, 20 Jan 2011 | 10:01 AM ET
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    Despite the public relations reality of the China-US trade deals,  the $45 billion is real money, and some high-profile companies are now a lot better positioned in China than they were a week ago.

  • Yuan: Too Weak or Vastly Undervalued? Wednesday, 19 Jan 2011 | 7:07 PM ET
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    The yuan debate has come to the fore again, with Chinese President Hu Jintao in Washington for a state visit. While many critics see the currency as vastly undervalued against the U.S. dollar, the case is far from clear when viewed against other currencies.

  • President Hu Jintao

    In its own way, China is the biggest supporter of the call to "Buy American, Hire American." China is our third-largest market, buying about $90 billion worth of our goods last year and supporting an untold number of American jobs.

  • Chinese President Hu Jintao

    President Hu Jintao is preparing to visit to defuse tensions with the United States, but he might not be able to keep relations from growing worse. The NYT reports.

  • Who Says China Grows at Others' Expense? Monday, 17 Jan 2011 | 4:04 AM ET
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    Despite criticism that it grows by keeping its currency weak to boost exports, China is actually increasing its domestic consumption very fast, Jim O'Neill, Goldman Sachs Asset Management chairman, told CNBC.

  • Banks to Make a 'Boxcar Full of Money' This Year: Pro Wednesday, 12 Jan 2011 | 1:04 PM ET

    The overall financial sector “looks great” this year, said Bill Spiropoulos, CEO of CoreStates Capital Advisors, a wealth management firm.

  • 100 Chinese Yuan

    China’s foreign exchange reserves surged in the fourth quarter by a record amount while the money circulating within the Chinese economy also climbed more than expected in December, according to government statistics released Tuesday that underline the country’s worsening inflation dilemma. The NYT reports.

  • China Tightening Will 'Get Much Worse': Strategist Wednesday, 5 Jan 2011 | 5:27 AM ET

    China is nowhere near seeing the end of inflation and the amount of monetary tightening it will have to implement will surprise the markets, Arjuna Mahendran, head of investment strategy at HSBC Private Bank told CNBC Wednesday.

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    Growth is too slow and unemployment is kept unacceptably high by surging imports, especially from China and Germany, which enjoy undervalued currencies.

  • Chinese shipping containers

    Ben Bernanke is right. Germany shouldn’t blame easy money in the United States for the world’s woes. Currency mercantilism in China and elsewhere is causing a mess—especially in the United States.

  • US-China Currency War on Collision Course: Market Pro Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 11:25 AM ET

    Currency friction between the United States and China is on a "collision course," as both countries manage two opposing monetary and economic interests, Jim Rickards, sr. managing director at Omnis, a market intelligence firm, told CNBC on Friday.

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    Chinese policy makers are striving to curb inflation, but their approach carries risks. For one thing, their plan flies in the face of steps the U.S. has been urging. The NYT reports.

  • Currency Fight With China Divides US Businesses Tuesday, 16 Nov 2010 | 8:10 PM ET
    Chinese Yuan and US Dollar

    American businesses that import Chinese goods face higher prices, but exporters are predicting sales growth. The NYT reports.

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    When the Federal Reserve announced last week that it would buy $600 billion in Treasury bonds to help bolster the economy, it quickly came under attack from Germany, Brazil and China. But the Fed’s plans earned a hearty endorsement from at least one foreign trade partner — India. The NYT reports.

  • Ambition to Build China’s Futures Sunday, 31 Oct 2010 | 3:08 AM ET
    CHina Stocks

    China’s commodities exchanges do not yet play a global role and they are limited by laws banning foreign participation as well as China’s renminbi capital controls. The FT reports.

  • Three Potential Consequences of ‘Currency War’ Tuesday, 26 Oct 2010 | 2:10 PM ET

    Fears of a "currency war," in which countries devalue their currencies to gain a trade advantage, dominated headlines last week ahead of the weekend meetings in South Korea of the finance ministers from the 20 leading economies that make up the Group of 20 (G-20).