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Pros Say: S&P to Rally Until March 2009

CNBC.com
Wednesday, 12 Nov 2008 | 5:12 AM ET

Asian markets closed lower on Wednesday as poor corporate earnings highlighted the damage on companies and consumers from the global economic slowdown. CNBC's experts believe the turmoil is far from over.

S&P Rally to Last Until March '09

After hitting an integral low on October 11, the S&P 500 index is expected to rally. Tom Hougaard, chief market strategist at City Index explains why he is bullish on the index through until March 2009.

More Gloom & Doom Ahead

Hans Redeker, global head of forex strategy at BNP Paribas gives a grim outlook of the global economy, saying he expects 4 to 5 consecutive quarters of negative growth in many economies.

Wall Street's Downtrend Has Been Broken

The Wall Street indexes are in a bottoming process, which began on 10 Oct., believes Bob Doll, CIO of global equities at BlackRock. He tells CNBC' that the downtrend has broken into a sideways movement.

Writedowns Nearing an End

We estimate another $91 billion worth of assets to be (possibly) written down within the next six to eight months. So we are very quickly approaching the end of the writedowns and all of these writedowns have already been priced into the market, Ralph Silva, director at TowerGroup said.

Safe Haven Plays Remain in Favor

As fears of a global recession persist, safe haven plays will continue to dominate the currency markets, says Win Thin, senior currency strategist at Brown Brothers Harriman.

Dollar Strength No Good for Corporates

If the dollar continues to strengthen, it could take the tailwind out of U.S. MNCs (multinational corporations), says Bob Doll, CIO of global equities at BlackRock.

Bailouts are Dollar-Negative

The U.S. government's bailout of troubled financials and the probable rescue of the auto industry are negative for the dollar, believes Jan Lambregts, Asia head of research at Rabobank International.

Aussie-Dollar Could Sink to $0.62

If the Aussie-dollar makes a clear break below $0.6450, it could sink as low as $0.62, predicts Jim Vrondas, manager of corporate business at OzForex.

$50 Oil is Possible

Crude oil at $50 a barrel is a possibility, says Peter McGuire, MD of Commodity Warrants Australia. He also thinks that base metal prices could continue to fall.

Emerging Markets: Last In, First Out?

Jonathan Garner, global head of emerging markets strategy at Morgan Stanley thinks the emerging markets, especially EM Asia, have a good chance of being last in and first out.

Overweight on HK & China

Ivy Pan, equity product specialist at ABN Amro Private Banking has recently upgraded Hong Kong and China markets to "overweight" from "neutral". She tells CNBC' how she is investing in these two markets.

Hot on North Asia

Within the emerging markets, the North Asian markets look the most attractive to Jonathan Garner, global head of emerging markets strategy at Morgan Stanley. He highlights the Taiwan and China markets.

How to Invest in India

When investing in India, sidestep financials, advises Jonathan Garner, global head of emerging markets strategy at Morgan Stanley. But he likes the tech names there.

India's Banking Sector Will See Stellar Growth

Although growth in India's economy is expected to slow, Aditya Puri, MD of HDFC Bank, believes the country's banking sector will be able to register growth of about 25% - 30% range in the foreseeable future.

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