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Michael Yoshikami

Michael Yoshikami
Founder & CEO, Destination Wealth Management

Michael Yoshikami, Ph.D., CFP®, is CEO and Founder of Destination Wealth Management and Chairman of DWM's Portfolio Strategy Committee.

Founded in 1986, Destination is a San Francisco Bay Area-based independent firm that provides fee-based wealth management services to institutional and individual investors. Michael was named by Barron's as one of the "Top 100 Independent Financial Advisors" six years in a row (2009 – 2014).

Michael has over 30 years of experience in the investment management and financial planning field. He oversees the economic viewpoints of the firm and the integration into client portfolios. As Chairman of the Portfolio Strategy Committee, he oversees the macro tactical asset allocation weightings for client portfolios. Additionally, he works with Destination's investment team in integrating behavioral investing strategies with the firm's core fundamental perspective.

Michael provides commentary to Reuters, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, and other international publications and publishes a weekly investment market/investing report that examines the macro environment and its impact on investment decisions.

He holds a Ph.D. in education, and has earned the Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation.


More

  • Yoshikami: The Death of Doom? Monday, 24 Aug 2009 | 12:37 AM ET

    With positive news popping up on a weekly basis, one might be tempted to think that gurus warning of doom and gloom are irrelevant. Nothing could be further from the truth.

  • With Asia rising, the West struggling under massive debt, commodity consumption going through the roof, and the shadow of high inflation haunting developed countries, there is no way that your current investment strategy can remain the same as it has in the past.

  • Yoshikami: The Death of Quality? Sunday, 9 Aug 2009 | 11:03 PM ET

    A sigh of relief can be heard by all after two brutal years in the equity markets. But there is something interesting occurring that is gaining little attention. Companies with consistent, stable cash flow, (and not highly leveraged) are underperforming more risky leveraged assets. What's going on?