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Oracle Operating Profit Rises, Matches Forecasts

CNBC.com with Reuters
Thursday, 18 Dec 2008 | 6:19 PM ET

Oraclereported a profit excluding one-time items that rose 8 percent and was in line with estimates.

Oracle's headquarters in Redwood City, California.
Paul Sakuma
Oracle's headquarters in Redwood City, California.

Excluding items, the business software maker said it earned $1.7 billion, or 34 cents a share, in its fiscal second quarter.

A consensus estimate among analyst who follow the company also put Oracle's earnings at 34 cents a share on sales of $5.86 billion, though Oracle itself projected earnings of between 35 and 36 cents a share.

Sales for the most recent quarter came in at $5.61 billion, a rise of 6 percent, below analysts' prediction of $5.84 billion.

Shares of Oracle were up more than 3.5 percent extended trading, after finishing the regular session down 0.78 percent at $16.61.

  • Get After-Hours Quotes for Oracle

Including one-time stock compensation and acquisition costs, Oracle's net income fell to $1.296 billion, or 25 cents a share, from $1.303 billion, or 25 cents, a year earlier.

"These guys have very good control on their spending," said Cowen & Co analyst Peter Goldmacher.

New software sales, known as license revenue, fell 3 percent from a year earlier to $1.6 billion during Oracle's second quarter ended Nov 30.

Wall Street was expecting new software sales to fall 0.38 percent from a year ago to $1.66 billion, according to a Reuters poll of 12 analysts conducted earlier this week.

Talking Tech Earnings
More on Research in Motion and Oracle's earnings, with CNBC's Jim Goldman.

In September, Oracle told investors that it expected second-quarter new software sales to rise between 2 percent and 12 percent, assuming a negative currency impact of 3 percentage points.

(Watch the accompanying video for more on Oracle's earnings numbers...)

During the course of the quarter, the euro fell 13.4 percent versus the dollar and the British pound dropped 15.4 percent against the U.S. currency.

A stronger dollar hurts revenue at the Redwood City, California company, because it reduces the value of overseas revenue when repatriated into the U.S. currency.

The software maker depends on international sales for more than half of revenue.

- Reuters contributed to thisreport.

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