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Pros Say: Don't Bet on Inauguration Rally

CNBC.com
Tuesday, 20 Jan 2009 | 4:21 AM ET

Barack Obama will become the 44th President of the United States on Tuesday. Ahead of Obama's inauguration, global stocks were mixed on investors' concerns about the economic difficulties confronting the incoming president. Experts on CNBC expect the dollar and U.S. stock market to fall on Obama's induction.

No Inauguration Rally for Wall Street

The U.S. market could go down after Barack Obama's acceptance speech on Tuesday, predicts Ray Barros, CEO of Ray Barros Trading Group.

Dollar Unlikely to Get an "Obama Bounce"

Hopes for an "Obama bounce" in the greenback are likely to be dashed, believes John Kyriakopoulous, head of currency strategy at NAB Capital.

Obama Will Not Quicken Recovery

The impact of Obama being sworn in and the hope that he is generating may lessen the downturn but it will not lessen the time taken to resolve the financial crisis, says Dodge Dorland, CIO at Landor Capital Management.

Obama May Cause the Demise of US

The most important message Obama needs to deliver when he enters the Oval Office is to prepare the nation for a lower standard of living. But that is probably not going to happen, says Kirby Daley, senior strategist at the Newedge Group.

Who Will Gain from Obama's Tech Spending?

Companies in the network infrastructure business will gain from Obama's move to upgrade the U.S.' technology infrastructure, believes Bhavin Shah, MD & head of global technology research at JPMorgan Securities.

Dollar is "Absolutely Doomed"

With promises of more U.S. government intervention, we are going to be in a situation of hyperinflation and a dollar that is absolutely doomed, warns Kirby Daley, senior strategist at the Newedge Group.

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