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Pros Say: Hedge Funds the Best Crisis Fighter

CNBC.com
Friday, 23 Jan 2009 | 4:43 AM ET

Global stocks ended the week lower Friday on heightened economic fears. The dollar and government bonds gained as investors parked their money in safe havens. Experts tell CNBC that investors may be better off in hedge funds, despite data showing that $155 billion was pulled out of funds last year.

Hedge Funds: The Least Risky Investment

Go for hedge funds as it is too risky to be in Treasurys, and too risky and too early to be long-only equities, advises Mark Fuchs, CEO of Fuchs Capital Partners. He explains why this is a safer bet.

Forget Dividend Yielding Stocks

Investors should buy into the high yield market or fixed income market, rather than dividend yielding stocks when trying to capture dividend yield to generate income, according to Diane Garnick, investment strategist at Invesco.

A Docile Year for the Ox

The bull is going to remain sleepy in 2009, says Tey Tze Ming, market strategist at Saxo Capital Markets. He tells CNBC his investment strategy for the year of the Ox, after doing fundamental research, technical analysis and consulting the Chinese zodiac.

Invest with a Long-Term View

As Stephen Gollop, CEO at Tyche foresees a recovery only in 2010, he advises adopting a long-term view when investing, adding that China and India look attractive.

Bearish on Oil

Oil prices will probably remain under pressure, says Vandana Hari, Asia news director for oil & gas at Platts.

Don't Get Your Hopes Up

Any sort of strength that we are currently seeing in Asia's currencies or stock markets is likely to be short-lived, says Sailesh Jha, senior regional economist at Barclays Capital.

Dollar-Yen May Test Sub-80 by Q1

Dollar-yen may test sub-80 by the end of this quarter, predicts Robert Rennie, currency strategist at Westpac Bank.

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