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Marketers Stretch Their Super Bowl Dollars

The Business of the Super Bowl
The Business of the Super Bowl

Not all Super Bowl marketers are spending millions to produce sleek commercials some are working with consumers, so they spread the word for them.

It's a win-win -- engaging consumers, empowers them, engendering brand loyalty, while the companies manage costs.

Sports Biz with Darren Rovell -- On the Ground Coverage of the Super Bowl
Sports Biz with Darren Rovell -- On the Ground Coverage of the Super Bowl

Kraft is trying to make Velveeta the centerpiece of Super Bowl chatter without shelling out $3 million for a 30-second spot the processed cheese product.

Instead it's sponsoring 2,500 parties in homes nation-wide.

Kraft and a company aptly-named House Party selected from 15,000 people who applied for the opportunity to get some free Velveeta and recipes in exchange for hosting parties. This weekend tens and tens of thousands of people will be exposed to Velveeta-focused dishes in their friend’s homes, in an environment that should feel as authentic as possible. Velveeta isn't paying the hosts who will act as Velveeta ambassadors, and whatever they're paying House Party, they're sure to get a serious return.

Meanwhile PepsiCo's Doritos is paying for a 30-second spot, but it's making the most of it.

For the past few months the chip company has been holding a competition in which consumers compete to create the best 30-second Super Bowl spot, for other consumers to vote on. This is the third consecutive year Doritos has hosted this competition, but this year it's giving away a $1 million reward if the winning consumer-generated ad hits number one on the ad meter.

Doritos insists the strategy has nothing to do with saving production costs, noting that it's invested in expanding Doritos website that runs the contest. Still, saving the millions of dollars it costs to make a commercial and being able to leverage that 30-second Super Bowl spot across months, seems like a financially responsible move.

Questions? Comments? MediaMoney@cnbc.com

  • Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.