GO
Loading...

Market Tips: Where to Hide When the Rally Fizzles

CNBC.com
Wednesday, 25 Mar 2009 | 10:03 AM ET

Global stocks were mixed Wednesday as the rally spurred by U.S. Treasury's bank plan ran out of steam. Experts tell CNBC that now is the time for investors to crystallize their gains as they see stocks hitting new lows.

Where to Hide When Markets Turn Down

If we see renewed weakness in equity markets, that would be consistent with a strong performance by the CTA macro hedge fund space, according to Benjamin Pedley, MD & investment strategist at LGT Investment Management (Asia).

Global Rally is Running Out of Steam

Sharon Lorimer

Benjamin Pedley MD & investment strategist at LGT Investment Management (Asia) believes the global rally is going to run out of steam as he sees the S&P 500 testing new lows.

When to Get into Stocks for the Long Term

We have seen rallies in the stock markets, in particular, rallies in the sectors "you would expect to see reflecting the anticipation of future growth. A lot of the early cyclicals, even the minerals and chemicals companies, coming through as well," Andy Hartwill from Quasar said Wednesday.

Arjuna Mahendran from HSBC Private Bank said investors should consider long-term stock buys if the U.S. shows stronger resolve to implement its 'bad bank' mechanism; if the S&P 500 index bottoms at around 650; and if the U.S. unemployment indicators and home prices indicate reduced rates of deterioration.

Rally Will End after the G20

"We're going to have deteriorating economies after the G20 with no policy reaction and this is going to be the doldrums for the next six months or so," David Bloom from HSBC said Wednesday. Countries that are not using quantitative easing will be the ones that perform very well, he added.

Global Rally Has Come To a Halt?

Global stock markets are currently undergoing high levels of volatility, leaving investors unsure of the whether the recent rally will remain intact. Karsten Schroeder, CEO of Amplitude Capital, told CNBC that the lows of February will be revisited, but not necessarily broken.

Investment Portfolios for 'All Weathers'

Diversification is key and investors should structure their portfolio for "all weathers," Antony Williams from Evolve Financial Planning told CNBC. Alain Schibl from Duet Asset Management joined the discussion.

Gold Will Hit $1,500

Based on technical analysis, gold is set to hit $1,500 by year-end, says Ray Barros, CEO of Ray Barros Trading Group.

Upbeat on Infrastructure Investments

Anoop Seth, co-head of Asian Infrastructure at AMP Capital Investors explains why he is bullish on the infrastructure sector in India & China.

Hot on Asian Automakers

Simon Godfrey, investment specialist, Asia at ex-Japan equities at Fortis Investments likes Asian automakers over their other competitors.

Time to Crystallize Gains

Now is possibly the time for investors to crystallize some of the gains that they've made, suggests Paul Ramscar, assistant director of private clients at Tyche.

Asian Lenders Have Stayed Conservative

Asia's banks will see a steady increase in bad loans in 2009 and 2010, says Peter Hoflich, associate editor at The Asian Banker. But as he tells CNBC the region's banks have learnt from the Asian Financial Crisis and have remained conservative lenders.

Cautious of Smaller Chinese Banks

Although Phillip Chan, director at Shenyin Wanguo Securities has a fairly optimistic outlook on Chinese banks, he is more cautious on the smaller ones.

HSBC Likely to Fall After Rights Expiry

HSBC's share price may see a 10% decrease after the rights expiry, predicts Castor Pang, strategist at Sun Hung Kai.

Australian Banks in Good Shape

The Australian banks are in good shape, says David Bell, CEO of Australian Bankers' Association. He speaks to CNBC that this is due to good lending decisions.

Featured

Contact Europe News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    › Learn More

Europe Video

  • Jan Dunning, CEO of St Petersburg-headquartered hypermarket chain Lenta, says the situation in Ukraine has had no impact on the group, as consumer confidence remains unaffected in Russia.

  • Vincent Deluard, European strategist at Ned Davis Research Group, says the strong euro is a problem for the region's companies, especially for the large exporters.

  • European shares closed higher on Thursday as investors brushed aside concerns regarding Ukraine and focused instead on Wall Street earnings and the latest U.S. jobs data.