GO
Loading...

Economic Reality for 'Deadliest Catch'

Tuesday, 31 Mar 2009 | 8:58 PM ET
Cramer's Catch of the Day
The fishing business is more dependent on the economy than one might think, according to Cramer.

We all know that “reality shows” can be about as staged as a World Wresting Entertainment match. But that isn’t the case with Discovery Channel’s Deadliest Catch. The show started as a documentary about the brutal business of crab fishing and has grown from there. The journeys these ships take and the lives of their crews are very real, in fact, and that’s why we keep watching season after season.

The most recent challenge this industry has faced, beyond the rough seas and hit-or-miss seasons of the North Pacific, has been the perfect storm of the economy. And no one knows this better than Capts. Keith Colburn and Sig Hansen, two of Deadliest Catch’s main characters. You’d be hard-pressed to find a commodity more cyclical than crab, so these guys feel every bit of a downturn.

That’s why Cramer wanted them to visit Mad Money. How have Colburn and Hansen fared in this recession? Is Darden’s Red Lobster friend or foe right now? How do Canada and Japan drive business? Do they invest in the stock market? Watch the video for the full interview.

Deadliest Catch Capts. Keith Colburn and Sig Hansen visit Cramer on the Mad Money set.
Photo by Candy Cheng
Deadliest Catch Capts. Keith Colburn and Sig Hansen visit Cramer on the Mad Money set.






Questions for Cramer? madmoney@cnbc.com

Questions, comments, suggestions for the Mad Money website? madcap@cnbc.com

  Price   Change %Change
DRI
---
WWE
---

Contact Mad Money

  • Showtimes

    Monday - Friday 6p ET
  • Jim Cramer is host of CNBC's "Mad Money" and co-anchor of the 9 a.m. ET hour of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street."

Mad Money Features

  • Grab the latest CNBC gear from the NBCUniversal Store!

  • Get a behind-the-scenes look at how Cramer formulates his investment advice. "Inside the Madness" is a column, which features e-mails and more with Cramer and his researcher Nicole Urken.

  • You’ve always wanted to hit the “Hallelujah!” button. Here’s your chance.