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Market Tips: Time for Summer Selling

Global stocks were mixed Friday as investors sought refuge after worse-than-expected U.S. jobs data. Trade was also thin due to the U.S. celebrating the long Independence Day weekend. Experts tell CNBC trade will be thin throughout the summer and now could be time to avoid volatility.

Take Money Off The Table

Jonathan Barratt, managing director of Commodity Broking Services says investors should take profit and pause as thin trade caused by the July-August holidays will lead to volatility in commodities.

Add Equities Moderately

Andrew Freris, senior investment strategist, BNP Paribas Wealth Mgmt says he is telling clients to stick to the short end of the yield curve and to add equities moderately.

More Reason to be 'Long' Dollar

There will be more reason for investors to be 'long' dollar as we move towards September, says Robert Rennie, currency strategist at Westpac Bank.

Investing in Brick & Mortar

Don't buy Chinese properties for yield but for capital appreciation, says Tim Murphy, MD at IP Global. He also reveals the other top places to buy real estate.

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