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Healthcare or No Care?

The richest nation cannot afford health care for its people?

From boardrooms to waiting rooms across the nation, people are intently debatingthe future of America's healthcare.

So where does it stand now?

After Aetna announced its earnings Monday, it’s clear that rising medical costs are the issue that’s front and center.

The third largest U.S. health insurer had the fourth largest decline in the S&P 500 after announcing the 28% drop in net income last quarter largely due to rising medical costs.

With the Obama administration and Congress feuding over how to pay for reform, no one is sitting by the sidelines.

President Obama has always lobbied for coverage for all Americans, but after proposing a most ambitious bill, his own party has grown dividedwith the Blue Dogs, a group of 52 fiscally conservative Democrats, balking at the $1 trillion price tag.

"We want to be the brokers of this health-care debate," said Rep. Ross, a member of the Blue Dogs. "Not a roadblock." He also added on Friday that there was no deal in the near future.

With Obama now admitting a bill won’t be signed into law by the end of summer as he had hoped, he’s setting his sights on the end of the year as the new deadline to get his ambitious agenda through Congress.

But either way Daniel Clifton of Strategas Research Partners says healthcare stocks are winners – that’s right winners.

I think we’re facing a good scenario for healthcare stocks in the short term. We either get a deal and an additional 30 million Americans get coverage or we don’t get a deal that there’s no change. Either way, healthcare companies win.

And for more, tune in Monday night at 9pm to CNBC as Maria Bartiromo hosts a panel discussion on this highly charged issue inMeeting of the Minds.



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Trader disclosure: On July 27th, 2009, the following stocks and commodities mentioned or intended to be mentioned on CNBC’s Fast Money were owned by the Fast Money traders; Seymour Owns (POT), (AA), (BAC), (AAPL), (FXI), (SBUX); Seymour's Firm Is Short (PBR); Najarian Owns (UNH) Calls; Najarian Owns (BTU) Calls; Najarian Owns (BUCY) & Short (BUCY) Calls; Najarian Owns (INTC) Call Spread; Najarian Owns (JPM) & Short (JPM) Calls; Najarian Owns (MS) & Short (MS) Calls; Najarian Owns (MSFT) & Short (MSFT) Calls; Najarian Owns (V) & (V) Short Calls; Najarian Owns (WNR); Najarian Owns (YHOO) Call Spread; Terranova Owns (MCD), (AMZN), (MSFT); Finerman Owns (RIG); Finerman's Firm Owns (MSFT), (NOK), (PBR), (RIG), (TBT), (WMT); Finerman's Firm And Finerman Own (BAC) Preferred Shares; Finerman's Firm And Finerman Own (WFC) Preferred Shares, Finerman's Firm Is Short (WFC); Finerman's Firm Is Short (USO), (IJR), (IYR), (IWM), (MDY), (SPY)

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