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Cramer: Gold Prices are a Sign of "Robust" Economic Growth

On a day that has seen the Dow up slightly and Gold hit the $1000 level for the first time since February 20th, Cramer is back and he hit on several key topics on Tuesday's Stop Trading! segment.

Nearly one year after the the fall of Lehman Brothers, certain stocks have performed extremely well since the market crushing event, including Shering Plough, Whole Foods , Ford, Micron and Nvidia . Speaking specifically of Micron and Nvidia, Cramer notes that they are both cyclical stocks that the market refuses to credit, highlighting them as names to buy if you think there is a strong global economy. Cramer thinks Whole Foods, Micron and Nvidia are all buys.

In the gold trade, AngloGold has shifted some long term capital - to the tune of nearly $1 billion- into shorter term investments. Is this the right move for the company? Cramer thinks so: "I think [AngloGold's CEO] knows gold better than we do," he says. Cramer also doesn't think the bullishness in gold has run it's complete course as asset-class capital is being diverted into the commodity. Unlike many people, Cramer actually thinks a weak dollar is a good thing. He also looks at the rise in gold prices as "a sign of economic progress and robust growth around the world."

For Cramer's full analysis on these topics and to get his take on the future of Cadbury and the company's situation with Kraft, check out the video!



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