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Market Tips: It's Time to Short Treasurys

Global stocks were in the green on Wednesday ahead of the Federal Open Monetary Committee's interest-rate announcement. Economists expect the U.S. central bank to keep interest rates low "for an extended period," even as the economy shows signs of improving.

But after the Reserve Bank of Australia raised rates for the second month in a row on Tuesday, experts told CNBC it is time to short Treasurys and bet on higher rates.

Short Treasurys

Short Treasurys and bet on higher rates, says Karl Eggerss, chief trader at LaffterFrishberg.com. Daryl Guppy, CEO of GuppyTraders.com charts the U.S. dollar index.

Dollar Weakens, Oil Rises

The greenback will weaken and oil prices will rise, says Daniel Cronin, commodities analyst at PitGuru.com.

Weakness in Dollar

The weakness of the dollar recently has been a reversal of the flight to safety trade, says Bob Baur, chief economist at Principal Global Investors.

Oil — The New Reserve Currency?

Oil is the new reserve currency, says Kevin Kerr, president & chief trading officer for Kerr Trading International. He tells CNBC what this means for oil direction. Daryl Guppy, CEO of GuppyTraders.com pulls out the charts on oil and the Baltic Dry Index.

Choose Silver Over Gold

Although Kevin Kerr, president & chief trading officer for Kerr Trading International is bullish on gold in the long-term, but he prefers silver to gold. Daryl Guppy, CEO of GuppyTraders.com charts gold & silver.

Winterizing Your Portfolio - A CNBC Special Report
Winterizing Your Portfolio - A CNBC Special Report

Shanghai Composite to Hit 3,400 by Christmas

The Shanghai Composite could hit 3,400 points by Christmas, according to Daryl Guppy, CEO of GuppyTraders.com. He pulls out the charts on the index, as well as property developer, Vanke.

China's Investment Boom

China's stimulus package has triggered the biggest investment boom in the country since 1993 and that will fuel growth for infrastructure and industrial sectors for the next few years, says Sun Mingchun, chief China economist at Nomura.