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'Fatalities' in Economic 'Boxing Match': Strategist

Kirsten Bennett, special to CNBC.com
Wednesday, 18 Nov 2009 | 5:36 AM ET

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the main event of the night.

In the red corner, weighing in with a confidence index of 47.7 for October is the US consumer. And in the blue corner, moving back up in weight class thanks to government stimulus measures is the megabank.

Your referee for this evening, the US government. Let's get ready to rumble!

That's the best analogy for the economy right now, according to Steen Jakobsen, group chief investment officer for Limus Capital Partners.

US Economy is â??Like a Boxing Matchâ??: CIO
The current economic situation is â??like a boxing match,â? Steen Jakobsen, group CIO at Limus Capital Partners, told CNBC Monday. The US consumer, in the red corner, is losing in the fight against the banks in the blue corner, he said, adding that the US government is playing the referee and â??using the rules of synchronized swimming for boxing, and that makes the game very confusing.â?

“The world is counting on the consumer coming back or China replacing it,” Jakobsen told CNBC.com, but “the banks are going for the kill, getting support from the referee (the US government) and hitting foul (not lending)."

The brawl between the US consumers who are “overall a little bit down on points” and the megabanks that are “making big bucks based on funding from the government,” is further confused with the way in which the US administration is refereeing the match, Jakobsen said.

“Thus far, they are refereeing everything naively,” much like a synchronized swimming match, he told CNBC during an on-air interview Monday.

The "rule confusion" in this match “is a combination of changing regulatory framework and a belief in government intervention,” he added.

Jakobsen -- a self-described “grumpy bear” -- said the match is confusing for investors, who are troubled by the current economic situation.

“Since mid-October, we’ve been grumpy bears,” he said, adding that “really the market is going nowhere to be honest; the dollar is slightly weaker every day."

“I see this (match) ending ugly with fatalities,” Jakobsen told CNBC.com in an interview following his on-air appearance.

Contact Europe: Economy

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