GO
Loading...

Market Tips: Buy on Dubai Crisis

CNBC.com
Monday, 30 Nov 2009 | 4:01 AM ET

Global stocks were mixed Monday, with Asian shares recovering after last week's selloff, while European shares dipped as concerns about the Dubai crisis weighed. Experts told CNBC the small correction caused by the Dubai crisis is a buying opportunity.

Dubai Crisis Presents Buying Opportunity

The mini-correction caused by the Dubai crisis presents a buying opportunity, says Adrian Mowat, chief Asian & EM equity strategist at JPMorgan.

Dubai's Woes Won't Derail Global Growth

Dubai's debt woes are not going to lead to any particular downward revisions to global growth, believes Mitul Kotecha, head of global FX strategy at Calyon Hong Kong.

Sovereign Debt Crisis in the Making?

Dubai's problems may be a warning sign of future problems in sovereign debt, says John Noonan, senior FX analyst at Thomson Reuters.

Impact of Dubai Crisis on Aussie

The Dubai crisis has likely ended any hopes of the Aussie reaching parity by Christmas, says Jason Anderson, senior economist at BIS Shrapnel.

Aussie Dollar Direction

People are willing to bail out on the Aussie dollar if risk aversion picks up, says Sean Callow, senior currency strategist at Westpac Bank.

Risk Aversion to Return

Expect risk aversion to return towards the year-end, says Mitul Kotecha, head of global FX strategy at Calyon Hong Kong. He tells CNBC what is weighing on market sentiment.

Winterizing Your Portfolio - A CNBC Special Report
Winterizing Your Portfolio - A CNBC Special Report

Gold: An Investor's Best Friend?

Gold is an investor's best friend in times of trouble, says Mathew Kaleel, co-founder & portfolio manager at H3 Global Advisors.

Don't Put New Cash Into Gold

Be cautious getting new money into gold, says Tony Chidiac from Ord Minnett. He tells CNBC that it is a volatile investment.

Soft Commodity Outlook

Outside fundamentals play a role in the soft commodity space, says Wayne Gordon, senior analyst at Rabobank.

Bleak Outlook for Commerical Property

The commercial property market in the U.K and the U.S. is still very grim, says Sean Callow, senior currency strategist at Westpac Bank.

Featured