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Daniel Bukszpan

Senior Writer

Daniel Bukszpan is a senior writer for CNBC.com. He has been a freelance writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • Inventions That Killed Businesses Friday, 14 Oct 2011 | 4:35 PM ET
    The forward march of technology is both unforgiving and unstoppable. As it mercilessly weeds out the old in favor of the new, once beloved products and services become less favored by consumers, while others simply become obsolete.It’s always been this way. The horse and buggy was once the dominant means of travel for Americans, but once the automobile was invented formerly solvent buggy makers found themselves out of a job.This dynamic repeats itself whenever a new invention comes along that si

    What follows is a list of products and services that became so indispensable to consumers that they instantly lost interest in their previous favorites.

  • Remakes That Made Less Than the Originals Tuesday, 11 Oct 2011 | 5:05 PM ET
    Hollywood has remake fever. While nobody ever accused the American film industry of having too many new ideas, the number of remakes being trotted out by the major studios lately is alarming -- as is their choice of movies to remake. For example, on Oct. 14, 2011, remakes of both 1984’s “Footloose” and 1981’s “The Thing” will come to theaters, and although no one can say how much money they’ll make, it’s hard to imagine that they’ll make less money than their 30-year-old predecessors. Or will th

    Hollywood has remake fever. What are notable movie remakes that made less money than the originals?Find out!

  • 10 Ways Your Job Is Killing You Monday, 10 Oct 2011 | 11:29 AM ET
    Employees who call in sick normally get most of the blame for lost productivity, but a phenomenon known as “presenteeism” has been gaining notice, as well. Defined as the act of coming in to work when you’re sick and doing a third-rate job as a result, presenteeism costs businesses billions of dollars a year in lost productivity.If presenteeism is damaging to businesses, then it would stand to reason that the workplace would be better off if sick workers stayed home until they got better. When t

    Coming in to work when you’re sick costs businesses billions a year in lost productivity, but many workplaces can make employees sick. Here are 10 ways that your work may be killing you and your employer.