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Daniel Bukszpan

Senior Writer and Producer

Daniel Bukszpan is a senior writer and producer for CNBC.com. He has been a freelance writer for 20 years and is the author of "The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal," published in 2003 by Barnes and Noble and "The Encyclopedia of New Wave," published in 2012 by Sterling Publishing. He also contributed to "AC/DC: High-Voltage Rock 'N' Roll, The Ultimate Illustrated History," "Iron Maiden: The Ultimate Unauthorized History of the Beast" and "Rush: The Illustrated History," published by Voyageur Press. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Asia, and his son, Roman.

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  • 10 Ways Your Job Is Killing You Monday, 10 Oct 2011 | 11:29 AM ET
    Employees who call in sick normally get most of the blame for lost productivity, but a phenomenon known as “presenteeism” has been gaining notice, as well. Defined as the act of coming in to work when you’re sick and doing a third-rate job as a result, presenteeism costs businesses billions of dollars a year in lost productivity.If presenteeism is damaging to businesses, then it would stand to reason that the workplace would be better off if sick workers stayed home until they got better. When t

    Coming in to work when you’re sick costs businesses billions a year in lost productivity, but many workplaces can make employees sick. Here are 10 ways that your work may be killing you and your employer.

  • Avoiding Hidden Credit and Debit Card Fees Friday, 7 Oct 2011 | 2:23 PM ET
    Master Card

    In September 2011, Bank of America announced that it would charge customers a monthly fee of $5 for debit card use.  Consumers may be unhappy with the decision, but they’re already paying fees on their credit and debit cards all the time. Here are some things to watch out for to avoid paying extra fees on credit and debit cards.

  • Million-Dollar Sports Injuries Tuesday, 4 Oct 2011 | 5:18 PM ET
    On July 30, 2011, the Indianapolis Colts decided not to mess with success. They renewed the contract of star quarterback Peyton Manning who, in a fit of generosity, agreed to five more years of service for a mere . He didn’t need to be the highest paid player in the NFL, he said, and he would make do with the same $18 million a year that Tom Brady squeaked by on.It turned out to be a better deal than anyone realized. On Sept. 7, 2011, after problems recovering from neck surgery that he had under

    What are some of the most notable multimillion-dollar sports injuries? Check out the list.