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Toxic Tiger?

As the PGA tells our Darren Rovell that Tiger's troubles have nothing to do with the fact that he's not pictured on their website at the moment, and as some official sponsors might be debating where to go from here, many marketing executives consider Tiger toxic.

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The Argyle Executive Forum released the results of a survey of 600 members of its senior marketing professional community. Three out of four of them would with cancel, reduce, or suspend their business relationship with Woods.

Argyle asked the question: "Given the information you have at the current time, would you keep or change your celebrity endorsement business relationship with Tiger Woods if you were currently using him in your campaigns?"

More than a third (37 percent) said they would suspend any business relationship they might have with Woods. One in four (25 percent) would cancel it, and 14 percent would reduce the relationship. On the other hand, more than one in five (22 percent) said they would maintain the relationship with the world's greatest golfer, and two percent said they'd even increase it. Surprised? It may all depend on your business.

Nike has certainly had its share of troubled athletes, but the brand is all about selling enhanced performance on the field/court/green, not performance away from the spotlight. Speaking of which, one Nevada brothel, the Moonlit BunnyRanch, is now trying to grab headlines by offering Woods a "free, all-access, lifetime pass to their facility."

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  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

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