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Will Super Bowl Save Jets From Lowering Prices?

The New York Jets are one win away from playing in their first Super Bowl in 41 years. And if there’s a year to get there, it’s this one.

NY Jets
AP
NY Jets

That’s because Jets owner Woody Johnson is trying to make good on his prediction that the new stadium will be completely sold out next year. Jets officials won’t say how many seats remain and they also won’t guarantee that prices won’t drop further.

Here’s what we know.

The most expensive Coaches Club seats, which carry personal seat licenses of $30,000 and a per game ticket price of $700, are sold out. So too are the Club Corners, which carry a personal seat license of $5,000 and a ticket price of $195 per game.

A couple months ago, the Jets dropped ticket prices on the least expensive seats with club amenities, from $500 a game to $395 and $295 a game and from $300 to $245 and $195 a game.

While the saving resulted in thousands of dollars, the overall percentage of savings wasn’t as great because the PSL prices –- ranging on these seats from $5,000 to $25,000 -– weren’t changed.

“We found that people just weren’t familiar with the idea of $400 and $500 per game tickets,” said Thad Sheely, the team’s executive vice president of stadium development and finance. “Coming from the old stadium, where they had no amenities, people just couldn’t grasp exactly why this was worth it. That’s why we felt like changing the ticket price made sense.”

As for how many seats were left to sell, Sheely would only say that the team will break new monthly ticket sales records this month. He also would not count out lowering prices in the future.

“We are going to do what it takes to sell out this building,” Sheely said. “Right now we have a lot of different prices and values and we have to be patient, especially with people who are considering buying season tickets and buying a personal seat license for the first time.”

That being said, if the Jets make it to the Super Bowl or win the Super Bowl, the team's gamble of keeping the PSL’s at their original prices has a much better chance of paying off.

Questions? Comments? SportsBiz@cnbc.com