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PepsiCo Reaffirms Long-Term Earnings Forecasts

PepsiCo maintained its forecast for long-term earnings growth as it looks to increase overseas revenue.

Pepsi
Pepsi

The world's second-biggest food and beverage company said Monday that it still anticipates 2010 earnings growth of 11 percent to 13 percent and low-double-digit profit growth for 2011 and 2012.

The forecast is on a core constant currency basis, which exclude certain items.

PepsiCo said it wants to boost its international revenue at two times the real global GDP growth rate.

The Purchase, N.Y. company also wants to gain market share in its snacks and liquid refreshment beverage segments in the top 20 markets.

Food from PepsiCo's snack business, Frito-Lay, will be more closely marketed with its beverages now that the company owns its bottlers, Pepsi Bottling Group and PepsiAmericas.

PepsiCo plans to hold a two-day investor meeting at Yankee Stadium in New York starting Monday.

PepsiCo to Cut Sodium, Sugar, Fat in Products

Also Monday, PepsiCo said it plans to cut the sodium found in each serving of its key brands by one-fourth in five years, as the industry deals with pressure from the government and health-conscious shoppers who want more options.

The maker of Frito-Lay chips and Pepsi drinks announced several nutrition goals Monday at the start of a two-day investor conference.

The company also set two goals for the next 10 years: to cut the average added sugar per serving by 25 percent and saturated fat per serving by 15 percent, in addition to adding more whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy into its array of products.

An array of food makers have announced similar goals recently as they come under more pressure from government and consumers. Last week Kraft Foods pledged to cut salt in its products sold in North America by an average of 10 percent over the next two years. ConAgra Foods and Campbell Soup have also announced sodium cuts.

Many health leaders have urged food makers to reformulate their products to reduce salt. First Lady Michelle Obama has made the fight against childhood obesity a top priority. Last week she asked the nation's largest food makers at a meeting of the Grocery Manufacturers Association to "step it up" and put less fat, salt and sugar in foods.

PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi told investors Monday that shoppers are focusing more on value amid the recession and on improving their health. She said governments around the world are exerting pressure to improve nutrition, but the company isn't waiting for mandates.

"So we're off doing our thing because the consumer is shifting," she said at the event at Yankee Stadium.

Last week the company announced it would remove full-calorie, sweetened drinks from schools worldwide by 2012. Both PepsiCo, the world's second-biggest soft drink maker, and No. 1 player Coca-Cola Co. adopted guidelines to stop selling sugary drinks in U.S. schools in 2006.