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Gary Kaminsky

Morgan Stanley, Vice Chairman, Wealth Management

Prior to joining Morgan Stanley as vice chairman, Wealth Management, in April 2013, Gary Kaminsky was CNBC's Capital Markets Editor and a regular contributor to "Squawk Box" and "Squawk on the Street." One of the original guest hosts of "Squawk Box," Kaminsky has brought essential market insight to CNBC since he joined the network 20 years ago.

From 1990 to 1992, he was an analyst at J.R.O. Associates, a New York hedge fund. In 1992 he joined Cowen & Company as a portfolio manager in the Private Banking Department and became a partner in 1996. Assets co-advised by Kaminsky rose from $200 million to $1.3 billion between 1992 and 1999. Cowen & Company was sold to Societe Generale in July 1998. In May of 1999, Kaminsky and his team joined Neuberger Berman LLC. Under his management, "Team Kaminsky" grew from approximately $2 billion AUM into $13 billion at the time of his retirement in June 2008.

Kaminsky is a 1986 graduate of the Newhouse Communications School at Syracuse University, where he received a B.S. in radio/TV/film management. He later completed an M.B.A. in finance from The Stern School of Business, New York University, in 1990.

Kaminsky is also the author of 2010's "Smarter Than the Street: Invest and Make Money in Any Market."

More

  • Explaining overbought & oversold  Friday, 24 Oct 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    Overbought means that the demand for a certain asset pushes the price of an underlying asset upward. Oversold, is when the price of an asset falls sharply. Gary Kaminsky explains.

  • Kaminsky: Munis best asset class  Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 10:20 AM ET

    Morgan Stanley's Gary Kaminsky discusses the panic at Wednesday's market open, saying municipal bonds have remained the best asset class.

  • Repairing our global reputation  Thursday, 17 Oct 2013 | 11:45 AM ET

    Gary Kaminsky, Morgan Stanley vice chairman, explains why the Fed has become the fourth branch of government and suggests investors "not pay attention" to the political "noise" in Washington.