GO
Loading...

Kate Kelly

CNBC Reporter

Kate Kelly joined CNBC in May 2010 as a reporter focusing on hedge funds and Wall Street. She appears during CNBC's business day programming and contributes to CNBC.com.

Previously, Kelly was a staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal, where she spent a decade. She covered numerous firms for the Journal including Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley as well as the movie business and the New York Stock Exchange. Before joining the Journal in 2001, she was a writer and reporter for Time magazine and, before that, a reporter at The New York Observer.

She has won a number of prestigious awards, including two Gerald Loeb Awards, four awards from the Society of American Business Editors and a Livingston Award for Young Journalists in the national reporting category.

She also has been honored by the Newswomen's Club of New York, the Medill School of Journalism and the New York City Deadline Club. She is the best-selling author of "Street Fighters: The Last 72 Hours of Bear Stearns, the Toughest Firm on Wall Street" and she released her second book, "The Secret Club That Runs The World: Inside the Fraternity of Commodity Traders," in June 2014.

Kelly holds a bachelor's degree from Columbia College at Columbia University.

Follow Kate Kelly on Twitter @katekellycnbc.

More

Shark Tank

  • Robert Herjavec made a $100,000 investment in return for a 10 percent of the holiday sweater company. Prior to the show, Tipsy Elves had about $750,000 in sales. Now they are projecting over $6,000,000 in sales for upcoming 2014 season alone and Herjavec says the company's possibilities for growth are endless.

  • While he has made more than 40 investments on "Shark Tank," it was Al "Bubba" Baker's Boneless Ribs that he considers his best.

  • Stephan Aarstol, Founder & CEO of Tower Paddle Boards

    On "Shark Tank," few people can screw up their pitch and still get a deal, but that's what happened to Stephan Aarstol.

The Profit

American Greed

  • An independent film spins out of control into a $28 million fraud when a filmmaker's silent partner and spiritual guru helps himself to investor funds.

  • Mac Parker pitched his film to friends and neighbors like Pedie and Armond Brisson and convinced them to invest with promises of big returns.

  • Mac Parker used his sterling reputation as a folksy storyteller to fund raise for his independent film.

Money Talks