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Clemens to Be Indicted for Perjury

Federal authorities have decided to indict Roger Clemens on charges of making false statements to Congress about his use of performance-enhancing drugs, according to two people briefed on the matter.

Roger Clemens being sworn in before testifying before US House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on February 13, 2008.
AP
Roger Clemens being sworn in before testifying before US House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on February 13, 2008.

An announcement is expected in the near future.

The indictment comes nearly two and half years after Clemens and his former trainer Brian McNamee testified under oath at a hearing before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, directly contradicting each other about whether Clemens had used the banned substances.

The committee held the hearing in February 2008, just two months after McNamee first tied Clemens to the use of the substances in George J. Mitchell’s report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. After Mitchell released the report, Clemens launched an attack on McNamee, saying he made up the allegations.

Federal authorities had McNamee cooperate with federal authorities in 2008 to avoid charging him with steroid distribution.

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