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  Monday, 22 Nov 2010 | 9:44 AM ET

Preet Bharara’s Arms Race Theory of Insider Trading

Posted By: John Carney

Lurking just below Peter Lattman’s report of the broad federal dragnet apparently underway against insider trading, you can faintly make out the outlines of a new theory of criminalizing insider trading.

NYSE trader
Getty Images
NYSE trader

Lattman, who covered the legal beat and later private equity at the Wall Street Journal before moving over to the New York Times, provides an especially informative report on the campaign, which is being led U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara.

“Illegal insider trading is rampant and may even be on the rise,” Lattman quotes Bharara as saying in a speech last month. “Disturbingly, many of the people who are going to such lengths to obtain inside information for a trading advantage are already among the most advantaged, privileged and wealthy insiders in modern finance. But for them, material nonpublic information is akin to a performance-enhancing drug that provides the illegal ‘edge’ to outpace their rivals and make even more money.”

The idea that insider trading is a “performance-enhancing drug” could merely be an attempt to ramp-up public anger at insider-trading by analogizing it to the drug-scandals in professional and Olympic sports.

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  Monday, 22 Nov 2010 | 8:46 AM ET

Massive Insider Trading Probe

Posted By: Ash Bennington

Economists Hold Mixed Views on Inflation Risks (CNBC via Reuters) The debate about whether deflation or inflation is a bigger risk to the U.S. economy isn't merely political: "About a third of NABE [National Association for Business Economics] panelists view the Fed's second asset purchasing program as somewhat lessening the risks of deflation, while another 33 percent saw the step as risking inflation." While that may seem less than definitive, note the following: "Still, they forecast the Fed's preferred measure of consumer inflation—the personal consumption expenditures price index excluding food and energy —to rise to 1.5 percent by the end of 2011 from a projected 1.0 percent this year." That range would be "below the Fed's considered comfort zone between 1.7 percent and 2.0 percent." One imagines that those who see inflation as the bigger threat may quibble with the exclusion of more volatile food and energy prices from the sample.

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 3:50 PM ET

Soc Gen Trader Convicted of Stealing Code

Posted By: Ash Bennington

Is China's Reserve Rate Hike a Countermove to QE2? (New York Times) As widely reported today: "Commercial banks were ordered to transfer an additional 0.5 percent of their assets by Nov. 29 to very low-yielding accounts at the central bank, the People’s Bank of China." How could that be viewed as a countermove against the Fed?

»Read more
  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 3:24 PM ET

Bernanke Tells the World to Shut Up About Quantitative Easing

Posted By: John Carney

Perhaps the most interesting part of Ben Bernanke's speech today was his claim that the Fed is not conducting quantitative easing at all.

Getty Images

Bernanke said:

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 1:56 PM ET

Paul Krugman's Solution to the Debt Problem: Government Spending

Posted By: John Carney

Paul Krugman and Gauti Eggertsson of the New York Fed have a new paper out arguing that the recession and persistent unemployment could have been ameliorated by aggressive government spending. It'll be getting lots of attention, I suspect, so you might as well start reading it now.

Paul Krugman
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Paul Krugman
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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 1:33 PM ET

If Quantitative Easing Will Fix the Economy, Why Didn't We Do This in 2008

Posted By: John Carney

Bryan Kaplan asks an important question about Ben Bernanke's policy choices:

As Sumner keeps telling us, all of Bernanke's research prescribed a simple solution : Maintain nominal GDP, and let the other chips fall where they may. This might have meant quantitative easing instead of targeting short-term interest rates, but that's it. Instead Bernanke became a key accomplice for the disgraceful series of bailouts, fiscal stimulus, and obfuscation about the zero nominal bound. The latest round of quantitative easing makes Bernanke's doublethink plain; if he thinks it's going to work in 2010, why wouldn't it have worked in 2008? And if it would have worked in 2008, why did he join Paulson and Bush's stampede?

In the end, Bernanke's behavior baffles me. He abandoned his own intellectual positions without explanation, humiliated himself, sparked a terrible recession, set a long list of dangerous precedents, and pushed the U.S. and the world down the road to serfdom. My best guess is that he simply didn't have the backbone to tell people like Paulson and Bush that they didn't know what they were talking about. Whatever the reason, though, the crisis forced me to rethink my optimism about the Fed. Bernanke and company ignored their own research, got predictably bad results, and pleaded impotence. Instead of playing the voice of reason, they acted like they'd believed in bailouts and fiscal stimulus all along. I expected better. I was wrong.

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 11:18 AM ET

Mike Bloomberg Kills Chances for White House by Sticking up for Rattner

Posted By: John Carney

Dan Primack at Fortune has been doing a heroic job covering Steve Rattner's travails. His post about NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg yesterday should be read by everyone.

AP

Primack wrote :

"Here's a sign that Bloomberg isn't seriously considering a run for president: His stubborn refusal to cut Steve Rattner loose, or even acknowledge that his friend is involved in a serious public corruption scandal.

For example, here's what he said back in June:

'I don't think [Rattner] did anything wrong… I happen to think the charge against him is ridiculous... I've always stood up for anybody that works with me who gets attacked by the press.'

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 11:09 AM ET

Structural Nightmares for US & China—But of a Different Kind

Posted By: Ash Bennington

One day, reality sets in. The most powerful force in the universe isn't love: It's the bond markets.

A Chinese and U.S. flag flutter in front of Tiananmen Gate on November 16, 2009 in Beijing of China.
ChinaFotoPress|Getty Images
A Chinese and U.S. flag flutter in front of Tiananmen Gate on November 16, 2009 in Beijing of China.

As Nouriel Roubini said this morning on Squawk Box , in a conversation with political scientist Ian Bremmer: "The bond vigilantes have not woken up for the US treasury market—yet."

Roubini's comments focused largely on the structural challenges of the United States. According to Roubini, here is the economic driver of the broader challenges the U.S. economy faces: "You can borrow at zero rates at the short end, and at 2.5 percent on the long end, why would you want to sacrifice when you can kick the can down the road?"

Democrats are dead set against entitlement reform—and the Republican Party is opposed to any kind of increase in taxes. And, Roubini believes, without major changes on both sides of that fiscal equation, it is nearly impossible to solve the United States' looming fiscal crisis.

In 2 to 3 years, Roubini says, there may be major insolvency issues with the individual U.S. states.

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 10:11 AM ET

Nicole Lapin's Short & Long List

Posted By: Nicole Lapin
Nicole Lapin
Nicole Lapin

Nicole Lapin, of CNBC's Worldwide Exchange, explains what she's long and what she's short this week.

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  Friday, 19 Nov 2010 | 9:45 AM ET

When Food Is Wall Street's Best Idea, You Should Probably Go on a Diet.

Posted By: John Carney
Ben Bernanke Stands Up For QE2

(Reuters) Perhaps the most interesting thing in Bernanke's defense of the Fed's inflationary policy is that he blamed recent currency movements on Europe's bailouts. Who knew he had that kind of chutzpah?

»Read more

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    Lawrence Delevingne is the ‘Big Money’ enterprise reporter for CNBC.com and NetNet.

  • Stephanie Landsman is one of the producers of "Fast Money."

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