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Don't Worry, Invest Happy

Tuesday, 12 Oct 2010 | 6:37 PM ET

"You need to worry about what you can control," Cramer said on Tuesday's "Mad Money." "And frankly, stop worrying about what you can’t."

Worth the Worry?
Cramer offers up some guidance in this market.

Investors shouldn't, for example, fuss about what action Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke might take. Bernanke has said many times he's trying to help bring the economy from subpar to regular growth so jobs can be created, Cramer argued. Therefore, he thinks time spent worrying about quantitative easing is wasteful.

Cramer thinks investors shouldn't fret over what President Obama wants to do either. While Obama's agenda could do "a lot of damage" to many industries, Cramer said there are many sectors that have been left untouched. He recommends identifying those industries and investing there.

"There are 6,000 publicly traded instruments out there," Cramer explained. "Surely you can find five or 10 that have only minimal involvement with issues beyond your control."

Instead of spending time worrying, Cramer recommends doing homework. Research companies, listen to earnings conference calls and read the transcripts.

"Worry about finding stocks that can make you money," Cramer said. "Forget all the other media-created evergreen nonsense that the press gins up just to have some controversy and the bearish money managers encourage so they can make up for their lousy performance."

Call Cramer: 1-800-743-CNBC

Questions for Cramer? madmoney@cnbc.com

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