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Stocks to Watch: AutoZone, Alcoa and More ...

Six in 60
Six in 60

Stocks plunged Thursday, led by technology, following disappointing results from Cisco, and troubles with European debt.

The Dow Jones Industrial Averagefell about 90 points after a lackluster trading session on Wednesday that ended with all the major indexes eking out gains.

So which individual stocks are worth watching today? Here are six that are on the move:

AutoZone Inc
The automotive parts retailer was trading at an all-time high Thursday with the shares up nearly 1 percent.

-----------Urban Outfitters Inc

The clothing retailer's price target was lowered to $41 from $44 at RBC Capital. The firm also cut earnings estimates for 2010 and 2011, while citing a more conservative view on the gross margin.

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99 Cent Only Stores
The discount retailer was upgraded to buy from hold at Deutsche Bank. The price target remained $18 with the shares up about 3 percent.

-----------RadioShack Corp
The electronic retailer was downgraded to equal-weight from overweight at Barclays Capital. The firm also cut the price target to $22 from $26.



The investment management company was upgraded to buy from hold at Citi. The firm also increased the price target to $210 from $180.

------------Alcoa Inc
The aluminum company was downgraded to market perform from outperform at BMO Capital.

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Get the latest stock picks on the CNBC Stock Blog, and see what analysts and others are watching before the bell each day at Analyst Watch.

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