GO
Loading...

Stocks to Watch: General Motors, Jabil Circuit and More ...

Six in 60
Six in 60

Stocks on Tuesday struggled to climb into positive territory after the markets got a weaker-than-expected consumer confidence number.

Where economists expected a 56, the Conference Board's index of consumer confidence fell to 52.5 in December from a revised 54.3 in November. All three major indexes—the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the Nasdaq and S&P 500—were in the red after about 90 minutes of trading.

So which individual stocks are worth watching on a (so far) down day like this? Here are six that are on the move:WW Grainger
The facilities-maintenance company was trading at all-time high levels on Tuesday morning.

----------

Murphy Oil
Murphy, meanwhile, had reached its highest share price since September 2008.

-----------

J.M. Smucker
This jelly maker was at its all-time high, a peak not seen since its 1959 IPO.

-----------Jabil Circuit
The electronic-manufacturing-services outfit was at its highest price since November 2007.

-----------

Air Products & Chemicals
APD managed to climb to $91.31, the highest the stock has been since August 2008.

-----------

General Motors
And finally, the newly public (again) automaker was up 2 percent after Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Barclays, Citigroup, Credit Suisse and J.P. Morgan had initiated "buy" coverage on GM.

______________________________

Get the latest stock picks on the CNBC Stock Blog, and see what analysts and others are watching before the bell each day at Analyst Watch.

Contact Squawk on the Street

  • Carl Quintanilla is an Emmy-winning reporter and co-anchor of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street," broadcast live from the NYSE.

  • Simon Hobbs co-anchors the 10 a.m. hour of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street" live from the New York Stock Exchange.

  • Jim Cramer is host of CNBC's "Mad Money" and co-anchor of the 9 a.m. ET hour of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street."

  • “Squawk on the Street” Co-Anchor

  • Rick Santelli joined CNBC Business News as an on-air editor in 1999, reporting live from the floor of the Chicago Board of Trade.