Top Performing Stocks of 2010

Consumer discretionary stocks are on track to close 2010 up nearly 26 percent, followed by industrial and material stocks, rising 24 and 20 percent, respectively.

The last time the consumer discretionary sector had a gain greater than 26 percent was in 2009, when it rose 39 percent for the year.

Technology stocks, which which finished 2009 as the best performing sector, up 60 percent, are among the laggards in 2010.

So far this year, consumer discretionary companies have an average gain of 29 percent, compared to all the companies in the S&P 500, which are up 20 percent.

Of the 81 stocks that constitute the consumer discretionary sector, 12 are trading in negative territory, with H&R Block falling the most, down 48 percent, followed by Apollo Group , with a loss of 34 percent.

Among the ten major sectors in the S&P 500 , health care and utility stocks are up the least, both up about a percent. A clear trend has developed this year, with four sectors outpacing the rest of the group as depicted on the chart below.


>> The Best Investments of 2010

Investors seeking opportunities for 2011 may benefit from looking at these trends, determining if valuations are now stretched or there is further room to the upside. What follows is an overview of the biggest percent gainers and losers within the top performing sectors in the S&P 500, month-to-date (MTD) and year-to-date (YTD).

Consumer discretionary stocks are on track to close 2010 up nearly 26 percent, followed by industrial and material stocks, rising 24 and 20 percent, respectively.

The last time the consumer discretionary sector had a gain greater than 26 percent was in 2009, when it rose 39 percent for the year.

Technology stocks, which which finished 2009 as the best performing sector, up 60 percent, are among the laggards in 2010.

So far this year, consumer discretionary companies have an average gain of 29 percent, compared to all the companies in the S&P 500, which are up 20 percent.

Of the 81 stocks that constitute the consumer discretionary sector, 12 are trading in negative territory, with H&R Block falling the most, down 48 percent, followed by Apollo Group , with a loss of 34 percent.

Among the ten major sectors in the S&P 500 , health care and utility stocks are up the least, both up about a percent. A clear trend has developed this year, with four sectors outpacing the rest of the group as depicted on the chart below.


Consumer discretionary stocks are on track to close 2010 up nearly 26 percent, followed by industrial and material stocks, rising 24 and 20 percent, respectively.

The last time the consumer discretionary sector had a gain greater than 26 percent was in 2009, when it rose 39 percent for the year.

Technology stocks, which which finished 2009 as the best performing sector, up 60 percent, are among the laggards in 2010.

So far this year, consumer discretionary companies have an average gain of 29 percent, compared to all the companies in the S&P 500, which are up 20 percent.

Of the 81 stocks that constitute the consumer discretionary sector, 12 are trading in negative territory, with H&R Block falling the most, down 48 percent, followed by Apollo Group , with a loss of 34 percent.

Among the ten major sectors in the S&P 500 , health care and utility stocks are up the least, both up about a percent. A clear trend has developed this year, with four sectors outpacing the rest of the group as depicted on the chart below.


Consumer discretionary stocks are on track to close 2010 up nearly 26 percent, followed by industrial and material stocks, rising 24 and 20 percent, respectively.

The last time the consumer discretionary sector had a gain greater than 26 percent was in 2009, when it rose 39 percent for the year.

Technology stocks, which which finished 2009 as the best performing sector, up 60 percent, are among the laggards in 2010.

So far this year, consumer discretionary companies have an average gain of 29 percent, compared to all the companies in the S&P 500, which are up 20 percent.

Of the 81 stocks that constitute the consumer discretionary sector, 12 are trading in negative territory, with H&R Block falling the most, down 48 percent, followed by Apollo Group , with a loss of 34 percent.

Among the ten major sectors in the S&P 500 , health care and utility stocks are up the least, both up about a percent. A clear trend has developed this year, with four sectors outpacing the rest of the group as depicted on the chart below.


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