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Disaster in Japan

  • Japan Could Face Another Recession: Morgan Stanley's Roach Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 12:41 PM ET

    Because of Japan’s many troubles, before and after recent events, the Asia nation could face recession again, Stephen Roach, Morgan Stanley’s non-executive chairman Asia, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Uranium Stocks Hit Hard by Japan Nuclear Crisis Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 2:02 PM ET

    Shares of uranium mining companies are down significantly because of the Japanese nuclear emergency, sparked by last week's earthquake and tsunami.

  • Hawaii Fears Economic Fallout From Japan Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 9:43 AM ET

    Japan is Hawaii's second largest market for tourists behind the US mainland. Last year, 1.2 million Japanese came to the islands and spent $1.9 billion, according to the state tourism officials.  Now, all of this is threatened.

  • G-7 Ready to Help Japan But Isn't Sure What Tokyo Wants Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 4:20 PM ET
    A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Japan will get what it wants from the Group of Seven teleconference of finance ministers and central bankers Thursday night, but G-7 sources say the group is still waiting for Japan to ask.

  • Japan Disaster Won't Harm US Banks Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 4:37 PM ET
    CNBC - Disaster in Japan - Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

    US banks do not have huge exposure to the disaster unfolding in Japan. On the face of it, JPMorgan has the biggest exposure with $53.9 billion of outstanding loans to Japanese companies. Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley come next, with Bank of America ranked fourth.

  • Backroom Talks, Secret Protocol Mark G7 Intervention Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 5:20 AM ET

    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • A man and his sister stand before their broken house, destroyed by the tsunami at Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture on March 17, 2011.

    Investors ought to "stay the course" despite all the turmoil in Japan and Middle East, though older investors should be more allocated toward bonds, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle told CNBC Friday.,

  • Fighting in the Middle East, the crisis in Japan and turmoil around the globe will provide more volatile days in the stock market—and opportunities for investors, Pimco's El-Erian told CNBC.

  • Deere Sees Itself Doubling in Size Over 8 Years: CEO Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 3:49 PM ET

    Heavy-machinery company Deere still sees itself doubling in size over the next eight years, due in large part to construction and agriculture in Asia, the corporation’s CEO, Samuel Allen, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Yoshikami: How to Outsmart Global Crises! Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 11:06 AM ET

    There is no shortage of challenges facing the world today and many investors are frozen waiting for clarity in these times of uncertainty. The problem is, in all likelihood, the world will not settle down any time soon and we will surely continue to see geopolitical shifts and unrest plaguing the investment world. So what are investors to do?

  • A couple walks past upturned vehicles sitting on a wall in the city of Miyako

    Almost two weeks since an earthquake and tsunami devastated a large part of Japan and forced Japanese automakers to shut down their plants, there's a growing panic with American car buyers.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Despite record inflows into the Japanese ETF, options traders are less than optimistic about a Japanese recovery.

  • How Nuclear Accidents Affected Markets 30 Days Later Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 12:55 PM ET
    Quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima

    A CNBC analysis of how markets reacted to previous nuclear accidents may help explain and predict the impact of the emergency in Japan.

  • Damaged houses, cars and debris after the earthquake

    Talk about a morning with wildly inconsistent messages about the auto industry's ability to build vehicles in the wake of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.

  • Mercedes-Benz CEO Warns of Supply Disruptions Monday, 28 Mar 2011 | 2:38 PM ET
    Mercedes

    Supply disruptions related to the earthquake and related crisis in Japan haven't affected Mercedes-Benz yet, but could down the road, warned Ernst Lieb, the automaker's U.S. CEO, in an interview with CNBC.

  • Young businessman who walks with superior

    As hundreds of thousands of young people begin their working lives on Friday, they face a transformed Japan that will test a generation reared in affluence yet dismissed by its elders as selfish materialists. The New York  Times reports.

  • Yoshikami: Japan's Quiet Uncertainty Friday, 1 Apr 2011 | 9:49 AM ET
    A pedestrian road has collapsed in the massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake in Urayasu city, Chiba prefecture. The earthquake shook Japan, unleashing powerful tsunamis that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    There seems to be little news to merit any optimism. The challenges facing Japan are great and daunting. But let's not discount the resilience and determination of the Japanese and let's not dismiss the Japanese economy.

  • Japan Warns Radiation Leaks Could Last Months Sunday, 3 Apr 2011 | 12:11 PM ET
    TEPCO workers in protective suits conduct a cooling operation by spraying water at the damaged No. 4 unitP at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex.

    Engineers pinned their hopes on chemicals, sawdust and shredded newspaper to stop highly radioactive water pouring into the ocean from Japan's tsunami-ravaged nuclear plant Sunday as officials said it will take several months to bring the crisis under control, the first time they have provided a timetable.

  • "When a natural disaster strikes, its victims most urgently need aid. Many companies respond by making direct donations and matching employee gifts. But in times of crisis, we advise companies to do more than give money," writes this author.

  • Ford Plans Big Push Into Green Cars, China Market Monday, 18 Apr 2011 | 10:59 AM ET
    The 2011 Ford Flex

    Ford Motor said it expects as much as a quarter of its sales to come from battery-powered cars by 2020 as it readies to roll out more hybrids, plug-in hybrids and pure electric cars. It also plans to introduce 15 new car models in China by 2015.

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