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Does the US Economy Need QE3?

A recent spate of weak economic data from the U.S. and certain parts of Asia have raised fears the global economy may be headed for a marked slowdown, with even talk of another recession.

The employment numbers out of the U.S. last week didn't do much to help allay those fears. Nonfarm payrolls rose by only 54,000 in May, the smallest increase for jobs since September 2010. Analysts surveyed by Reuters had expected to see 150,000 jobs added in May after a gain of 244,000 jobs in April.

It has all led to speculation that the Fed will be forced to embark on QE3 to prevent the fragile global economy from slumping again. Citi, for one, thought a payrolls number below 50,000 would spark an urgent call for another round of quantitative easing from the Fed.

The topic has ignited its fair share of debate. Those in favor say the weak global economy needs it to support growth. The dissenters argue it will just add to inflationary pressures down the road.

We want to know what you think.

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