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Managing Your Money for the Year Ahead

On Wall Street, the January Effect refers to the tendency of stocks to rise in the first month of the year as new money enters the market.

Deborah Harrison | Photographer's Choice | Getty Images

On Main Street, it might as well be the tendency of people to use the new year as an opportiunity to make resolutions that rarely survive the month.

We're not, however, talking about losing weight or exercising; we're interested in the financial decisions that will pay off throughout the year — saving, preserving allocating and investing money.

Such an exercise can be as basic as getting organized or as complicated as finding the right sectors in which to invest.

Our special report, "Your Money Resolutions," is all about taking care of your money: getting organized, improving your balance sheet, maximizing retirement income, assessing risk and identifying the right equity sectors.

Plus, you'll learn what our market prognosticators expect from various markets in 2012.

Commodities

Currencies

  • CNBC's Susan Li looks ahead to what are likely to be next week's top business and financial stories. The New Year arrives this week and the Dow reached the 18,000 mark. No jobs report this week. And UPS and Fedex announced they would change pricing.

  • CNBC's Sara Eisen takes a look at the fall of bitcoin in 2014.

  • Five thousand rouble notes.

    Russia said its currency crisis was over despite its forex reserves plunging and inflation surging over 10 percent.

Mutual Funds

  • Mad Money's Jim Cramer helps investors understand the problem with the mutual fund model. Cramer says a cheap S&P 500 index fund is the least bad way to passively manage your money.

  • NEW YORK— Go big and stay home. Anyone who followed that strategy with their mutual funds in 2014 is likely sitting on another year of healthy returns. Funds that focus on stocks of the biggest companies were some of the year's strongest performers, while U.S. stock and bond funds generally did much better than their foreign counterparts.

  • NEW YORK, Dec 23- Investors in U.S.-based mutual funds pulled $9.4 billion out of bond funds in the week ended Dec. 17 on profit-taking following gains in bonds this year, data from the Investment Company Institute showed on Tuesday. Funds that specialize in U.S. stocks posted $4.2 billion in outflows, while funds that mainly hold international shares posted $2.4...

Bonds

Stocks