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Managing Your Money for the Year Ahead

On Wall Street, the January Effect refers to the tendency of stocks to rise in the first month of the year as new money enters the market.

Deborah Harrison | Photographer's Choice | Getty Images

On Main Street, it might as well be the tendency of people to use the new year as an opportiunity to make resolutions that rarely survive the month.

We're not, however, talking about losing weight or exercising; we're interested in the financial decisions that will pay off throughout the year — saving, preserving allocating and investing money.

Such an exercise can be as basic as getting organized or as complicated as finding the right sectors in which to invest.

Our special report, "Your Money Resolutions," is all about taking care of your money: getting organized, improving your balance sheet, maximizing retirement income, assessing risk and identifying the right equity sectors.

Plus, you'll learn what our market prognosticators expect from various markets in 2012.

Commodities

Currencies

Mutual Funds

  • A nurse wears a special uniform to be protected from the Ebola virus at a state hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, in August 2014.

    American investors aren't panicked about the re-emergence of Ebola in Africa, at least in the long term.

  • Dollars are pouring into China again despite worries about the country's slowing economic growth. China's economy also still has its doubters, as do broad swaths of its stock market. Much of the worry centers on how well China can navigate a slowdown in its economic growth.

  • Fund managers may face tougher scrutiny by regulators than planned after their lobbying against a first proposal backfired, sources said.

Bonds

Stocks