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CNBC PRESENTS “LOVE AT FIRST BYTE: THE SECRET SCIENCE OF ONLINE DATING” ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9TH AT 9PM ET/PT

CNBC ORIGINAL REPORTED BY NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENT AMY ROBACH TAKES VIEWERS INSIDE THE TWO BILLION DOLLAR ONLINE DATING INDUSTRY

SEE WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU MIX SCIENCE, LOVE AND MONEY…

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J., January 31, 2012—Online dating, once a refuge for the socially challenged, has gone mainstream, and is now a multi-billion dollar a year business fundamentally changing the way we seek relationships. Hundreds of websites cater to every preference—all trying to unlock the secrets of the human heart—with science. But can a computer algorithm really help find your perfect match?

On Thursday, February 9th at 9pm ET/PT, CNBC presents “Love at First Byte: The Secret Science of Online Dating” a CNBC Original reported by NBC News and Today Show Correspondent Amy Robach that takes viewers inside the booming online dating industry. From major corporate players to the hundreds of niche websites that accommodate daters of every conceivable interest and background, CNBC, First in Business Worldwide, explores the science that claims to use secret computer algorithms to convert the desire for companionship into romantic success.

Robach goes behind the scenes at the headquarters of the most influential online websites—Match.com and eHarmony—profiling the small armies of computer scientists, mathematicians and psychologists who claim they can draw revealing conclusions about you, not only by what you say, but by what you do—and don’t do—on their websites. With both sites claiming a high success rate, CNBC speaks with experts who examine those claims and question whether the algorithms actually capture a client’s personality and preferences. CNBC also profiles a number of online daters who have used these sites—both successfully and unsuccessfully—in hopes of finding the perfect mate.

CNBC introduces viewers to Samantha Daniels, a former divorce lawyer thriving in a trade that pre-dates the Internet by centuries. Daniels is a modern-day matchmaker, who claims that the rise of online dating has actually revived her old-world industry. With many of her clients being unhappy refugees from the land of online dating, Daniels claims that even the best computer equation can’t outmatch human intuition.

Roughly one in ten Americans visit online dating websites each month, spanning in range from digitally savvy twenty-something to baby boomers seeking a fresh start. Whatever their age, a growing number of online daters are using cutting-edge mobile technology in their search for love. Robach accompanies a group of young singles who use a mobile application called “Skout” to connect to other nearby mobile daters with just the click of a button. Mobile dating applications have taken off not only in cities like New York and Los Angeles, but are gaining steam all over the country. Many experts and credible observers agree that the future of online dating is on mobile devices.

For more information including slideshows and web extras, log onto: onlinedating.cnbc.com.

Mitch Weitzner is the Senior Executive Producer. Wally Griffith is Senior Producer. Morgan Brasfield, Deborah Camiel, Na Eng, and James Segelstein are Producers. Ray Borelli is the Senior Vice President of Strategic Research, Scheduling and Long Form Programming.

CNBC’s “Love at First Byte: The Secret Science of Online Dating” will re-air on Thursday, February 9th at 10PM ET/PT.

About CNBC:

With CNBC in the U.S., CNBC in Asia Pacific, CNBC in Europe, Middle East and Africa, CNBC World and CNBC HD+, CNBC is the recognized world leader in business news providing real-time data, analysis and information to more than 390 million homes worldwide. The network's 16 live hours a day of business programming in North America (weekdays from 4:00 a.m.- 8:00 p.m.) is produced at CNBC's global headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., and includes reports from CNBC News bureaus worldwide. CNBC.com and CNBC Mobile Web (mobile.cnbc.com) offer real-time stock quotes, charts, analysis and both on-demand and live streaming video.

Members of the media can receive more information about CNBC and its programming on the NBC Universal Media Village Web site at http://www.nbcumv.com/mediavillage/networks/cnbc/